Mastering Body Language

Body language can speak volumes about a person. Learning to master your body language and effectively reading another’s body language is the key to all social interactions. Last time, we mentioned mirroring body language and avoiding negative body language. Here we will discuss in detail what that means.

When talking with someone, look for actions of engagement, such as head nods, forward leans, and eye contact. These are the actions that you want to casually mirror. This will create a more relaxed atmosphere. Smile, but do so genuinely. Fake smiles can be spotted a mile away.

Be conscientious of cues you are being given from the other person and be less focused on the next thing you have to say! Look for disagreement cues such as leaning back, frowning, or looking away. This is a sign that it might be time to spin the wheel of topics. Try redirecting the conversation. If these cues are still present, it might be time to move on.

When engaged in social interactions, distance is key. Standing too close to someone can be an immediate turn-off, resulting in that person stepping back. You may also see tension cues such as face touching or leaning away. Touching someone is never advised during first interactions. Touch, like distance, is very intimate and shows a level of trust that is rarely achieved during a first conversation.

Many people do not know what to do with their hands. The hands can give off unintentional negative cues. To avoid this, keep your hands unclasped and relaxed. Never place them on your hips or cross your arms. These are defensive cues that are not effective in networking.

Body language makes up 55 percent of what we communicate to others. It is essential to business and networking that we are aware of what we are telling others at any given moment.

Wells Fargo

The name Wells Fargo is forever linked with the image of a six-horse stagecoach thundering across the American West, loaded with gold. The full story, over more than 160 years ago, is rich in detail with great events in America’s history. From the Gold Rush to the early 20th Century, through prosperity, depression and war, Wells Fargo earned the reputation of trust due to its attention and loyalty to customers.

The Vision, Values and Goals of Wells Fargo details the enduring principles that guide all Wells Fargo team members in the work they do every day – in serving customers and helping each other.

Wells Fargo wants to satisfy their customers’ financial needs and help them succeed financially. This unites them around a simple premise: Customers can be better served when they have a relationship with a trusted provider that knows them well, provides reliable guidance, and can serve their full range of financial needs.

Five Primary values guide every action that Wells Fargo takes:

  1. Do what is right for the customers. They place customers at the center of everything they do. They want to exceed customer expectations and build relationships that last a lifetime.
  2. People as a competitive advantage. Wells Fargo strives to attract, develop, motivate, and retain the best team members – and collaborate across businesses and functions to serve customers
  3. They are committed to the highest standard of integrity, transparency, and principled performance. They do the right thing, in the right way, and hold themselves accountable.
  4. Diversity and inclusion. They value and promote diversity and inclusion in all aspects of business and at all levels. Success comes from inviting and incorporating diverse perspectives.
  5. Wells Fargo is called to be a leader. They want their staff to lead themselves, lead the team, and lead the business – in service to customers, communities, team members, and shareholders.

Wells Fargo is committed to being the best they can be – for each other, their customers, their communities, and for their shareholders. They have the will and the drive to build a better Wells Fargo, every day.

https://www.wellsfargo.com/

Harvest CrossFit

Harvest CrossFit has classes that fit everyone wherever they are in their fitness journey. Classes range from beginners to advanced. Harvest Foundations Class is a great way to learn the foundations of CrossFit in an environment where everyone is a beginner! This is a 4 week course, Mondays and Wednesdays, designed to help new members to build their foundation.

At Harvest CrossFit you can expect a general warm up and stretching, ample instruction, the scored portion of your workout, and a brief cool down. The workouts are programmed for you. The coaches make sure everyone understands how to scale and load the movements. Their athletes just show up, follow instructions, and work hard. Harvest CrossFit does all the thinking!

The Harvest CrossFit environment goes beyond the workout. The connections made typically carry out into the rest of your life. If you are a business owner, or responsible for a business, the people you meet here can translate into business deals and partnerships. The demographics at Harvest CrossFit is almost entirely young professionals in our community who choose to use the business of people that they know.

To join the Harvest CrossFit community, it is as easy as giving us a call or sending an email from their website. Devin or MacLarin Jones will discuss with you your next steps!

http://www.harvestcrossfit.com/

Washington Street Steakhouse & Pub

Washington Street Steakhouse & Pub has always had award winning food and service, and they have no intention of stopping now.

Statesman Journal recently held the 2019 Best of the Mid-Valley election. Washington Street Steakhouse & Pub won NINETEEN awards by popular vote! Thank you to everyone who took time and voted for Washington Street.

Washington Street won gold in appetizers, brunch, casual dining, steak, bar, happy hour, Best Dallas Bar, Best Dallas Restaurant, and Best Reason to Visit Dallas.

They also won Silver in Best bartenders, best date night, breakfast, catering, lunch spot, and sandwich. Don’t forget Washington Street also won Bronze in Best barbecue, burger, dessert, and place to take out of town guests.

Established in 1999, Washington Street Steakhouse & Pub is a local favorite in Dallas with a family-friendly dining room and separate relaxed atmosphere pub offering microbrews, a full pub, and Oregon Lottery. Invested in our community Washington Street Steakhouse has sponsored, and assisted with after school programs and sports, and strives to bring citizens together through their events.

“We are so grateful for all our employees and customers. Thank you again for voting for us. “

–Washington Street Steakhouse & Pub

As they like to say, “The Place to Meet is Washington Street”.

www.washingtonststeakhouse.com

Promise

Did you know in that in 1986 Dallas Oregon went to Hollywood? Rather, Hollywood came to Dallas Oregon! That’s right, the movie “Promise”, starring James Garner and James Woods, was filmed right here on Main Street and inside the Blue Garden.

Long absent from his family, Bob Beuhler (James Garner) returns home after his mother’s death to find she has left him her estate and placed his brother, D.J. (James Woods), in his care. Harking back to a promise made many years earlier, Bob cannot bring himself to put D.J., who suffers from epilepsy and schizophrenia, in a home. Slowly, he and his brother bond, and in the process Bob rehabilitates his own scars, including the mark left on him by his childhood sweetheart (Piper Laurie).

Join us on Saturday, May 18th for a re-screening of the movie at Dallas Cinema! Tickets are $5.00 and available for purchase online or at the box office!

After the movie, hop on over to Blue Garden for an after party! There will be lots of fun memories shared and maybe even some surprises!

Awards and Nominations for Promise:

 

Awards

  • 1987Peabody Award — CBS Entertainment, Garner-Duchow Productions[5]
  • 1987Emmy Award for Outstanding Drama/Comedy Special
  • 1987 Emmy Award for Directing in a Miniseries or a Special — Glenn Jordan
  • 1987 Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Miniseries or a Special — James Woods
  • 1987 Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or a Special — Piper Laurie
  • 1987 Emmy Award for Outstanding Writing in a Miniseries or a Special — Richard Friedenberg
  • 1987Golden Globe Award for Mini-Series or Motion Picture Made for TV
  • 1987 Golden Globe Award for Lead Actor — James Woods
  • 1987 Humanitas Prize— Richard Friedenberg[6]
  • Christopher Award[2]:193

 

Nominations

  • 1987 Emmy Award for Outstanding Cinematography for a Miniseries or a Special — Gayne Rescher
  • 1987 Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Miniseries or a Special — James Garner
  • 1987 Golden Globe Award for Lead Actor — James Garner
  • 1987 Golden Globe Award for Supporting Actress — Piper Laurie

Creating a Memorable Website

It’s the goal of pretty much anyone with a website: to have users that come back again and again. They share your content; they engage with you regularly; they tell others about the website. They remember the website. It doesn’t happen by accident. A memorable design is a tool that will help create this user connection. Here, we’re going to look at seven ways to create a lasting impression with seven stunning examples of how to do it. Learn how to create a design that sticks in the long term, and doesn’t fly under the radar!

  1. Make an Impression

Users will remember the first thing they do on your website, as well as the last thing they do. It’s important that the memory is a good one. Strong visuals on the landing page and a seamless finish to an action are key.

  1. Tell a Story

A website is your gateway to the world. It’s an opportunity to tell people who you are and why you matter. Whether the story is that of a brand or a travel blog, effective storytelling is the thread that keeps users hanging on. Telling that story is a two-part process: Strong text to tell, and interesting visuals to show. You’ll need both elements to put together a complete package.

  1. Use Color Effectively

Too much color and a design can cause users to abandon the site, too little color and the design can be forgotten. Right in the middle is an interesting mix of color that will stick with users. The trick to color is to create a palette that works for your content but also contrasts with a lot of the other things users come in contact with regularly.

  1. Do Something Fun

What comes to mind when you think “fun website?” A game? A movie preview? What about design techniques such as color, imagery and typography? Any of these elements can make your design feel like fun. A smiling faces in images or video, bright, saturated colors, something to do (a game), or light, playful language.

  1. Engage the Senses

It’s all about the writing and imagery when it comes to connecting with a users’ senses.

One option is to interact with users and provide feedback. For example, a user inputs something into the website and something else is returned. Another option is to entice them into thinking about your design.

  1. Mix It Up

Some websites are designed to have new content all the time, because they do connect with a repeat user base. Changing the content or tweaking the design can provide new an interesting experiences for users that encourage them to think about your site more often and return to it. The key is that the new experiences should still feel like your content and design.

  1. Remember the Finish

You’ve got a plan to delight designers with your homepage, the visual are stunning, there’s a great call to action, but don’t forget the finish. Just as important as the first impression is the final impression. Knowing how to design this can take a little more work because users might leave your website from a different location than where they enter (at least you hope they do).

Dig through your analytics and find the page where most users are leaving and make that experience a good one. Create an offer to give users something – a good discount or printable/digital element – or lasting memory of the best part of your website.

Memorable website design is one of those tricky areas because it almost happens to users subconsciously. Do you ever stop and say “I’m going to remember that website!”? It’s doubtful. But you do tend to remember some of the elements of what makes a website good. The key is that users leave happy.

Please… Tell Me More

Networking is the backbone to nearly everything in life. It is how we meet new people in all areas of our personal and professional lives. Yesterday we discussed the first step in face-to-face networking – approaching someone. You have exchanged introductions and have engaged in small talk. Now what?

Many conversations die after the small talk. It is the job of the initiator to keep it going. This can be done very easily and fluidly by asking casual questions. These can include asking about their job, education, workplace, or where they live or grew up. What are their hobbies, favorite books, or music preferences? All of these topics can help keep the conversation flowing and create opportunities to find what you have in common with this person. Just remember to only ask those questions that you are willing to answer yourself.

Conversations seem to flow in a basic evolution. This evolution can be seen in nearly every conversation and not just those between two people who have met. Small talk leads into humorous banter, which eventually leads to a deeper discussion of thoughts and ideas. It is often here where you begin to learn more about the person. This knowledge can help uncover if they are a passive candidate who might be a great fit for your organizations.

There are some very basic rules to make your networking conversations successful.

  1. Talk about yourself sparingly. Add your thoughts, but do not hijack the conversation and make it about yourself.
  2. Employ the “Tell Me More” method of engagement. Aske the person to expand on their thoughts.
  3. Speaking slowly shows confidence and reduces the need for space-fillers.
  4. Be judgment-free and show empathy.
  5. Compliment the person’s success, style, or work ethic, but NEVER their beauty.
  6. Avoid the topics that provoke one’s emotions, especially politics and religion.
  7. Mirror their body language and avoid negative body language.
  8. Abide the golden rule – give your conversational partner your full attention. Always practice active listening.

A key concept most are not aware of is that the more questions you ask, and the more others talk about themselves, the more they think you are interesting. You read that right. The more engaged your conversational partner is, the more interesting you become.

Keeping the conversation going beyond the introductions and small talk is the next step in mastering the art of networking. Follow these rules and you will be able to talk to anyone in any setting.

Networking to Get Ahead

Networking is a great way to foster relationships with leaders in your industry. It can also help uncover passive candidates. Striking up a conversation at an industry event, conference, or local networking group can open a world of potential for your organization.

The first step to networking is to approach a new person or a group of people. This can be the scariest step in the whole process. Even the most confident person can become intimidated when encountering the unknown.

Take a deep breath and walk up to the person you would like to engage in conversation. If the person is not already engaged, politely introduce yourself and shake their hand. Remembering that person’s name is key. The easiest way to do so is to repeat their name, “Joe, it is very nice to meet you.”

The best conversation starter after exchanging introductions is to ask a question. “What brought you here?”, “Have you been here before?”, “How do you know the host?”, or “What would you recommend at the bar?” Utilize the setting to frame your first questions. This will break the ice and help both you and the person you are speaking with feeling more comfortable.

Make certain that you give the person your complete attention. Stimulate the conversation by adding input, without “one-upping” the person. Redirect the conversation to yourself by offering a compliment or your thoughts. Then redirect back to the other person by asking a question.

Pauses in the conversation are natural. Do not try to fill them with sounds such as “un” or “ah”. Even though the word “like” is used in many ways, it should never be used as space-filler within your statements. Avoid using these fillers by taking a deep breath while you collect your thoughts.

The key to approaching anyone is showing confidence with a handshake and remembering their name. After you have broken the ice, you can begin asking questions, but always be aware of how you are received. The one you are speaking with should never feel like he is being interrogated. The goal is to create a quick bond that will make both you and your conversational partner feel comfortable.

Wall Insurance

Insurance you can trust. Wall Insurance is proud to serve the insurance needs of Dallas and all of Oregon. Let Wall Insurance help you find the right insurance to meet your needs.

The agency was established in 1957, and purchased by Jim Wall in 1980. Barbara Powers has worked in the agency since the 80’s and purchased it in 2016 when her father Jim decided to retired. “I was so blessed to work by his side all those years, and learn from the best.”

Insurance tailored for you. Wall Insurance strive to offer you quality insurance coverage, a high level of professional service and long-term relationship. Wall Insurance is licensed in all line of insurance, are an independent agency representing multiple carriers. Every employee in the agency is a licensed agent. Several of Wall Insurance agents have nationally recognized insurance designations, and those that don’t are working towards them. Barbara firmly believes in ongoing education to keep up with the changing market.

 “Excellent service. Excellent people. I recommend everyone check with them for all their insurance questions and needs! I was a long time State Farm customer, however the people and service at Wall Insurance was well worth the switch. They worked with me to find a policy that was perfect for me and I intend to be a customer for a long, long time!”

“Wall Insurance is a family business. They treat you as part of the family. When I moved to another state they made a phone call to another agent they knew in my new area to take care of me. Now I am back in Oregon and I am happy to be back with Wall!”

http://wallinsurance.com/

Columbia Bank

Wherever you are headed, Columbia Bank has the people and resources to help get you there. It starts with “Hello.” They never forget a name of a face. Real human beings answer their phones. Their commitment to providing all the services required to help the build strong Northwest communities is firmly rooted in their DNA.

They started in 1993 as a community bank. While their community has grown and their computers have shrunk, they are still the same bank that puts people first. Columbia Bank is a Northwest community bank headquartered in Tacoma, Washington, with comprehensive solutions and expertise to meet the evolving needs of businesses and individuals.

Growth is vital to remaining a preferred option for customers. It advances the services and expertise they provide on their customers’ behalf. Columbia Bank has grown both organically and through acquisition, in cases where they recognized the benefits of a strong fiscal and cultural fit. In the process, they have leveraged their community-minded, locally committed way of doing business from a single branch to a 150+ branch regional footprint throughout Washington, Oregon, and Idaho.

Today they employ a wide range of extraordinarily smart and devoted people, delivering relationship-based customer service. Most important, they have maintained their dedication to being THE community bank in each and every community they serve.

They demonstrate this commitment through their comprehensive approach to community engagement, empowering employees to address the unique needs of their communities through four distinct pillars: fundraising, employee giving, volunteerism, and company giving. Providing support through these employee-driven pillars allows them to have the greatest impact in the communities they serve. Because of these efforts, they are deeply woven into the fabric of our communities.

People truly do make the difference.

https://www.columbiabank.com/