Patriot’s Day

Patriot’s Day is a day celebrated in some parts of the U.S and commemorates the battles of Lexington and Concord. It is a day that is observed on the third Monday in April. It’s most often recognized in Massachusetts, Maine, Wisconsin and parts of Florida. It should not be confused with Patriot Day – a day that is observed on September 11th to mark the date of the terrorist attacks.

This holiday was first proclaimed by Governor Frederic T. Greenhalge in 1894 in Massachusetts. He commemorated the day on April 19th to Battles of Lexington and Concord in 1775. By doing so, he replaced the day that was originally celebrated on that day – Fast Day, a now obsolete U.S holiday. Several years later, Maine followed Massachusetts lead and replaced their Fast Day with Patriot’s Day.

This holiday is observed in a number of different ways. In Massachusetts and Maine, people can be found reenacting the battles of Lexington and Concord on this day. Other people use this time off of work or school to plan days at the park with their friends and families. And in Boston, people from all over the world flock to the city to watch the Boston Marathon on this day.

National Mom and Pop Business Owners Day

March 29th is National Mom and Pop Business Owners Day which celebrates small business owners. These individuals spend countless hours nurturing and growing their young enterprises. The workload demands, and lack of a hired staff, often translates into long and late hours, and many missed family and personal events. But, all in all, they love what they do. After all, they are their own boss.

New businesses have always been a vital, yet not fully appreciated, part of the US economy. On the retail side, they bring different and unique products to the marketplace. They provide stellar and personal service support. When you call, you are most likely getting a real, live person. And unlike big national chains, they know their products. They are outstanding performers in the niche markets. In manufacturing, they create many new concepts and ideas, making them creators of new products.

Celebrate National Mom and Pop Business Owners Day by showing your support and shopping their stores today and every day. Dallas is blessed to have many Mom and Pop Businesses, people that you know and who know your name in return. Businesses such as Grandma’s Attic, Dallas Antique Mall, and Main St. Emporium for shopping. For food be sure to visit West Valley Taphouse, El Pique, or Washington Street Steakhouse and Pub. Stop in today as they are always happy to see you!

Presidents Day

Are President’s Day and George Washington’s birthday the same day? There is some confusion about this holiday. Here is a short summary of Presidents’ Day and where the confusion began!

Contrary to popular belief, the observed federal holiday is actually called “Washington’s Birthday.” Neither Congress nor the President has ever stipulated that the name of the holiday observed as Washington’s Birthday be changed to President’s Day. Additionally, Congress has never declared a national holiday binding in all states and each state decides its own legal holidays. This is why there are some calendar discrepancies when it comes to this holiday.

So how did Washington’s Birthday come to be called President’s Day? Many calendars list the third Monday of February as Presidents’ Day and many U.S. states list the holiday as President’s Day. Of course, all of the 3-day retail store sales are called “Presidents’ Day” sales and this vernacular has also been influential in how we reference the holiday.

George Washington Quote:

Upon entering office, Washington was not convinced that he was the right man for the job. He wrote, “My movements to the chair of government will be accompanied by feelings not unlike those of a culprit who is going to the place of his execution.” Fortunately for the young country, he was wrong.

Worry is the interest paid by those who borrow trouble.

  • George Washington (1732-99)

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National Plan For Vacation Day

Did you know that over half of Americans report having unused vacation time at the end of the year? Don’t let that be you!

National Plan for Vacation Day, celebrated on the last Tuesday of January, is a day to encourage Americans to plan their time off. You don’t have to go to exotic places, or half way across the country to relax. Take a staycation and learn about the area you live in.

Steps for planning your vacation time:

  1. Confirm your time off benefits with your employer. Determine how much time off you earn. Don’t forget to make note of any office closures, weekends, and major holidays. Americans who plan out their vacation days are more likely to use all their time off, and the best planners know the key to success is blocking the calendar early.
  2. Create your own itinerary for your visit to the Mid-Willamette Valley! Check out some sample itineraries based on travel styles to get some ideas!
  3. Share your dates with your manager, and share your trip with your family and friends! Americans who plan out their vacation days are more likely to use all their time off, and the best planners know the key to success is blocking the calendar early.
  4. Don’t forget to share your photos on social media, tagging the places and businesses you visited.

Have fun!

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Martin Luther King Jr.’s Birthday

Martin Luther King Jr. Day is a federal holiday held on the third Monday of January. It celebrates the life and achievements of Martin Luther King Jr., an influential American civil rights leader. He is most well-known for his campaigns to end racial segregation on public transport and for racial equality in the United States.

Martin Luther King Jr. was an important civil rights activist. He was a leader in the movement to end racial segregation. His most famous address was the “I Have a Dream” speech. He was an advocate of non-violent protest and became the youngest man to be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. He was assassinated in 1968.

In 1968, shortly after Martin Luther King Jr. died, a campaign was started for his birthday to become a holiday to honor him. After the first bill was introduced, trade unions lead the campaign for the federal holiday. It was endorsed in 1976. Following support from the musician Stevie Wonder with his single “Happy Birthday” and a petition with six million signatures, the bill became law in 1983. Martin Luther King Jr. Day was first observed in 1986, although it was not observed in all states until the year 2000.

Martin Luther King Jr. Day is a relatively new federal holiday and there are few long-standing traditions. It is seen as a day to promote equal rights for all Americans, regardless of their background. Some educational establishments mark the day by teaching their pupils or students about the work of Martin Luther King Jr. and the struggle against racial segregation and racism. In recent years, federal legislation has encouraged Americans to give some of their time on this day as volunteers in citizen action groups.

So tomorrow, reflect on Martin Luther King Jr.’s dream. That all man be treated equally.

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A Christmas History Part 2

It wasn’t until the 19th century that Americans began to embrace Christmas. Americans re-invented Christmas, and changed it from a raucous carnival holiday into a family-centered day of peace and nostalgia. But what about the 1800s peaked American interest in the holiday?

The early 19th century was a period of class conflict and turmoil. During this time, unemployment was high and gang rioting by the disenchanted classes often occurred during the Christmas season. In 1828, the New York city council instituted the city’s first police force in response to a Christmas riot. This catalyzed certain members of the upper classes to begin to change the way Christmas was celebrated in America.

In 1818, best-selling author Washington Irving wrote The Sketchbook of Geoffrey Crayon, gent., a series of stories about the celebration of Christmas in an English manor house. The sketches feature a squire who invited the peasants into his home for the holiday. In contrast to the problems faced in American society, the two groups mingled effortlessly. In Irving’s mind, Christmas should be a peaceful, warm-hearted holiday bringing groups together across lines of wealth or social status. Irving’s fictitious celebrants enjoyed “ancient customs,” including the crowning of a Lord of Misrule. Irving’s book, however, was not based on any holiday celebration he had attended – in fact, many historians say that Irving’s account actually “invented” tradition by implying that it described the true customs of the season.

Also around this time, English author Charles Dickens created the classic holiday tale, A Christmas Carol. The story’s message – the importance of charity and good will towards all humankind – struck a powerful chord in the United States and England, and showed members of Victorian society the benefits of celebrating the holiday.

The family was also becoming less disciplined and more sensitive to the emotional needs of children during the early 1800s. Christmas provided families with a day when they could lavish attention – and gifts – on their children without appearing to “spoil” them.

As Americans began to embrace Christmas as a perfect family holiday, old customs were unearthed. People looked toward recent immigrants and Catholic and Episcopalian churches to see how the day should be celebrated. In the next 100 years, Americans build a Christmas tradition all their own that included pieces of many other customs, including decorating trees, sending holiday cards, and gift-giving.

Although most families quickly bought into the idea that they were celebrating Christmas how it had been done for centuries, Americans had really re-invented a holiday to fill the cultural needs of a growing nation.

Christmas Facts:

  • Each year, 30-35 million real Christmas trees are sold in the United States alone. There are 21,000 Christmas tree growers in the United States, and trees usually grow for about 15 years before they are sold.
  • The first eggnog made in the United States was consumed in Captain John Smith’s 1607 Jamestown settlement.
  • Poinsettia plants are named after Joel R. Poinsett, an American minister to Mexico, who brought the red-and-green plant from Mexico to America in 1828.
  • The Salvation Army has been sending Santa Claus-clad donation collectors into the streets since the 1890s.
  • Rudolph, “the most famous reindeer of all,” was the product of Robert L. May’s imagination in 1939. They copywriter wrote a poem about the reindeer to help lure customers into the Montgomery Ward department store.
  • Construction workers started the Rockefeller Center Christmas tree tradition in 1931.

A Christmas History Part 1

Christmas is both a sacred religious holiday and a worldwide cultural and commercial phenomenon. For two millennia, people around the world have been observing it with traditions and practices that are both religious and secular in nature. Christians celebrate Christmas Day as the anniversary of the birth of Jesus of Nazareth. Popular customs include exchanging gifts, decorating Christmas trees, attending church, sharing meals with family and friends and, of course, waiting for Santa Claus to arrive.

The middle of winter has long been a time of celebration around the world. Centuries before the arrival of Jesus. Early Europeans celebrated light and birth in the darkest days of winter. Many peoples rejoiced during the winter solstice, when the worst of the winter was behind them and they could look forward to longer days, and extended hours of sunlight.

In the early years of Christianity, Easter was the main holiday; the birth of Jesus was not celebrated. In the fourth century, church officials decided to institute the birth of Jesus as a holiday. Unfortunately, the Bible does not mention date for his birth. Although some evidence suggests that his birth may have occurred in the spring, Pope Julius I chose December 25th. It is commonly believed that the church chose this date in an effort to adopt and absorb the traditions of the pagan Saturnalia festival. First called the Feast of the Nativity, the custom spread to Egypt by 432 and to England by the end of the sixth century. By the end of the eighth century, the celebration of Christmas had spread all the way to Scandinavia. Today, in Greek and Russian orthodox churches, Christmas is celebrated 13 days after the 25th, which is also referred to as the Epiphany or Three Kings Day. This is the day it is believed that the three wise men finally found Jesus in the manger.

By holding Christmas at the same time as traditional winter solstice festivals, church leaders increased the chances that Christmas would be popularly embraced, but gave up the ability to dictate how it was celebrated. By the Middle Ages, Christianity had, for the most part, replaced pagan religion. On Christmas, believers attended church, then celebrated raucously in a drunken, carnival-like atmosphere similar to today’s Mardi Gras. Each year, a beggar or student would be crowned the “lord of misrule” and eager celebrants played the part of his subjects. The poor would go to the houses of the rich and demand their best food and drink. If owners failed to comply, their visitors would most likely terrorized them with mischief. Christmas became the time of the year when the upper classes could repay their real or imagined “debt” to society by entertaining less fortunate citizens.

In the early 17th century, a wave of religious reform changed the way Christmas was celebrated in Europe. When Oliver Cromwell and his Puritan forces took over England in 1645, they vowed to rid England of decadence and as part of their effort, cancelled Christmas. By popular demand, Charles II was restored to the throne and, with him, came the return of the popular holiday.

The pilgrims, English separatists that come to America in 1620, were even more orthodox in their Puritan beliefs than Cromwell. As a result, Christmas was not a holiday in early America. From 1659 to 1681, the celebration of Christmas was actually outlawed in Boston. Anyone exhibiting the Christmas spirit was fined five shillings. By contrast, in Jamestown settlement, Captain John Smith reported that Christmas was enjoyed by all and passed without incident.

After the American Revolution, English customs fell out of favor, including Christmas. In fact, Christmas wasn’t declared a federal holiday until June 26th, 1870.

Wake Up Wednesday News

Technical Genius Solutions

Is your computer running slow? Tempted to use your laptop as a Frisbee? This week only, Technical Genius Solutions is running a free computer diagnosis special. Bring your computer in and they will work hard to have it running like new!

https://tgsoregon.net/

 

West Valley Taphouse

Tap Takeover Thursday! Gigantic Brewing will be in the house from 6 pm to 9 pm showing off their beers and giving away free swag. While you are enjoying a good beer to order the Food Special; Roasted Squash Fondue. Roasted acorn squash filled with a Gruyere and Emmenthaler beer cheese fondue and breadcrumb topping!

Saturday is Timbers Championship Game at 5 pm. Wear your Timers colors for $1 off all drinks during the game!

West Valley Taphouse Christmas Tree is up! This year West Valley is holding a pajama drive. Help United Way of the Mid-Willamette Valley give foster children a new set of pajamas this holiday season. You have until December 16th to get your pair under the tree.

Guys Shopping Night is coming up! West Valley Taphouse has partnered with Main St. Emporium to provide a way to have your beer, and get your holiday shopping done without spilling a drop. Main St. Emporium vendors will be visiting West Valley Taphouse to help pick out, pay, and gift wrap your gift to the special people in your life. Come on down!

http://westvalleytaphouse.com/

 

YoungPros

The last YoungPros of the 2018 series will be held this December 12th, at Focal Point Photography. Don’t miss this opportunity to hear from Gene Henshaw with Public Policy about how important it is that business members be involved in Public Policy.

YoungPros was able to assist with a scholarship that helps local Dallas High School students attend college. If you would like to help sponsor this scholarship then reach out to them. This is a great opportunity to support our community.

http://business.dallasoregon.org/events/details/young-pros-networking-2323

 

Washington Federal

The Giving Tree is up! This year Washington Federal will be helping CASA children. If you would like to help a family this holiday season, then stop on by and pick up a tag. Washington Federal Giving Tree will be running until December 21st.

https://www.washingtonfederal.com/locations/oregon/dallas

 

City of Dallas

Adopt of Family is still looking for sponsors. They have about 108 families adopted so far but need at least 115 more to meet their anticipated need. If you have a bowling group, office group, or other group that could work together to adopt a small, medium or large family to provide a food box and gifts for children, you can sign up by going to www.surveymonkey.com/r/DAAFHelp. Thank you for your Generous support!

 

Dallas Area Chamber of Commerce

State of the Chamber is the theme of our next Luncheon. Hear from JD, CEO, about what we have been busy working on this year while you are at work. This is also a great opportunity for our new members to learn what resources are available to them via Chamber Login, and Chamber staff. Don’t miss this chance to put “one more bullet in your Chamber.”

http://business.dallasoregon.org/events/details/chamber-luncheon-2332

United Way of the Mid-Willamette Valley Pajama drive is still going. Our box is about half way full, but knowing our Dallas community we expect to see it over flowing. Bring in your new pajamas for infants, toddlers, kids, or teenagers before December 17th!

Dallas Area Chamber of Commerce is providing Christmas Cheer with peanut butter. They help those in need enjoy holiday food shopping Christmas Eve, and is a wonderful program. Drop off your jar of peanut butter, crunchy or smooth, before December 23rd.

 

Dallas Area Visitors Center

Santa Clause is coming to town!

Join us as we kick off the holiday season on the beautiful Polk County Courthouse lawn with Santa, tree lighting with our Mayor and First Citizen, food trucks, Christmas vendors, live music, hot cocoa, cookies, and more! This year we will be celebrating a good ol’ fashioned holiday season, complete with a Christmas Carol “sing-along.

Shop some great vendors such as Beal’s Christmas Tree Farm, Oregon Snowballs, Paparazzi, Banners by Jules, Scentsy, Color Me Shabby, Color Street, The Hat Place, and so many more!

Come on down for a jolly fun time and don’t miss your chance to visit the Big Man in Red!

For more information contact Shelly jones at (503) 623-2564 or at events@dallasoregon.org.

Sounds of Christmas

This year is Guthrie Park’s 31st Annual Sounds of Christmas program. Guthrie Park is a 501-c non-profit organization dedicated as a meeting and gathering place for the community. Their purpose is to promote Cultural events such as music, art, and dancing. Finances are generated through public donations and rental fees paid for the use of Guthrie. There are no paid employees under this organization. Besides the board of directors several people, who refer to themselves as “Friends of Guthrie”, volunteer their time and talents to assist and care for Guthrie Parks’ needs.

The 31st Annual Sounds of Christmas program is a benefit to raise funds for the maintenance and operation of Guthrie Park Community Center. It is also meant as a way for the community to gather and share in an old fashioned Christmas celebration. Just as was done over 100 years ago when Guthrie was a community school.

All events at Guthrie Park are family friendly! Alcohol and controlled substances are strictly prohibited.

Musicians will be performing Holiday music live! Artists such as Once Blind, Sarah & Jason, and Cash & Company.

There will also be prizes raffled off to the audience. Tickets cost $1 and $5 each. All proceeds will go toward the maintenance and operation of Guthrie Park. Tickets will be sold only at the show, and you must be present in order to win. There are a wide selection of items to win such as; gift cards, toys, tools, jewelry, Holiday treats, treasures and much more! This is a great opportunity to treat yourself, or regift for a loved one.

Santa Claus will also be there after the show to visit with the children. A Sing-A-Long of Christmas songs and music jam after the show with words provided! Dress casually or dress up in your favorite Holiday Attire! Refreshments will be provided, but feel free to bring and share your favorite Holiday treat. Seating is limited and doors open at 5:45 pm. Admission is free, but donations are welcome.

Please check the interactive calendar for any updates as to detail on the event or changes to the events schedules.

For more information go to www.guthriepark.org, 503-623-0809, or guthriepark@gmail.com.

Dallas Adopt A Family

The Dallas Adopt a Family Committee would like to thank you for supporting us and taking the time to give back to our Dallas community. In 2017 over 200 families and 12 youth were adopted totaling more than 1,000 individuals, including 622 children.  

The holidays are just around the corner and we know our community needs will be high this year. If you are able, we are asking for your help to adopt a local family by providing food for a Christmas meal and gifts for each child in the home. If you are unable to shop, but would still like to adopt a family, monetary donations are welcome. We have volunteers that will take care of the shopping and wrapping for you.

In November, we will be registering families in need of assistance. As families register they will be matched with our generous donors. Donors can expect to receive their adoption packet no later than the first week of December.

If you are interested in adopting a family, please complete the online donor registration form at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/DAAFHelp  and return it to the Dallas Resource Center (182 SW Academy St. Suite 220). Donor registration must be completed and received no later than Thursday, November 29th at 5pm.

With your help, we can make this a wonderful Christmas for the families in our community.

Thank you,

 Dallas Adopt a Family Committee

 

Interested in volunteering? Simply complete the online form at the attached link above. Shopping Day will be held on Monday, December 17th, and Wrapping Day is Tuesday, December 17th.On December 19th Donors may drop off their wrapped gifts and foods. Thursday, December 20th volunteers will be assisting families as they pick up what the community has provided.

Donations are needed for wrapping paper, ribbon, tape, gift tags, laundry baskets, laundry detergent, toilet paper, and $25 Safeway and Walmart gift card. All donations can be dropped off at the Dallas Community Resource Center before December 18th.

Dallas Adopt a Family matches local families with community member, agencies, businesses, clubs, and churches who would like to “adopt” them for Christmas. Each adopted family receives food to prepare a Christmas meal and a gift for each child from ages zero to eighteen.