Business Ethics

The Dallas Area Chamber of Commerce recently received an email from an involved citizen. We felt it was important to share with our community.

Good morning Mr. Shinn!

I just wanted to send the Dallas Chamber some positive feedback- a student I tutor on the weekends was working on a business project at our session, and she ended up on the chamber website… She thought you would like to know that we explored it and found excellent info for her project, so she says thank you 🙂 And- Sophia and I thought we could return the favor by sharing another educational business resource we found, so she picked one out and I told her I’d send it today… “Guide to Business Ethics” — https://onlinebusiness.northeastern.edu/neu-msf/guide-to-business-ethics/

Sophia thought it would be a good addition to the DACC’s Business toolkit page (this one https://dallasoregon.org/business-toolkit/) because “it has really helpful information on business ethics and why it’s important.” I hope you can add it-Sophia would be so proud to see that her research & contribution were helpful… and I’d love to show her at her next tutoring session 🙂 Thanks so much JD and Happy Thanksgiving!!

Sincerely,
Sophia & Miss DeCesare

The Dallas Area Chamber of Commerce strives to help grow and educate our business community. It was great to hear how our site was helpful and even more encouraging that Sophia is looking into concepts for business.

The article that Sophia was so kind to recommend discusses the importance of having a code of ethics, and how it can negatively or positively affect a business’s reputation. People want to work with companies, and with people who uphold strong ethics concerning both their customers and their employees.

Businesses will, at times, find themselves needing to validate, and assess their code of conduct. “When there is public trust in an organization’s actions, the company can succeed. And when the employees who participate in creating and sustaining the company culture believe in what the business stands for, then the company can continue to thrive from the inside out…” The Dallas Area Chamber of Commerce strongly recommends following the above link.

We are so grateful to receive feedback from young, involved citizens such as Sophia, and Edith. Thank you again Sophia for passing on this information, and to Edith for helping to educate our youth!

Mid-Willamette Valley Leadership Summit

On November 6th, from 9 am to 2 pm we will gather at Dallas Retirement Village to grow as business and community leaders. Please join us for the first Mid-Willamette Valley Leadership Summit.

What will the Summit entail?

We invite all leaders and their teams from the Mid-Willamette Valley to come learn how to implement proven methods for growing as a community of understanding.

Tickets are $77 per person.

What community doesn’t need better communication and more revenue?

We sense an urgency for increasing our region’s capacity to build relationships and increase the collective efficacy of the regional community. With that in mind, we are fulfilling our role as a community catalyst by launching the very first Mid-Willamette Valley Leadership Summit.

We will gather on November 6th, 2018, at Dallas Retirement Village, for discussion of how we as business and community leaders, can lead from the front to become a community of outward thinkers and community of understanding. Along with our capacity to work together. We will share some out of the box ways to increase revenue.

We’ll learn about having an outward mindset by an organization that has a proven method to change lives and transform organizations.

In the afternoon session, we’ll hear from a procurement specialist who will share secrets to attaining contracts to increase your business revenue.

 

Agenda:

November 6, 2018

8:30-9 Check in

9-11:45 Arbinger Institute “The Outward Mindset” –  Arbinger makes the connection between behavior, mindset, and results. They will share proven work that equips people to understand and effect change at the level of mindset to change an organization’s culture, resolve conflict, and facilitate dramatically better organizational results.

11:45-12:30 Lunch (Included in your ticket)

12:30-2 Procurement – How can your business gain resources and contracts for growth?

  • Secretary of State Small Business Advocacy Team – structuring your business, business information and assistance cutting through red tape
  • Certification Office for Business Inclusion and Diversity – the beneftis to becoming certified with the State of Oregon as a women-owned, minority-owned, service-disabled Veteran owned, or emerging small business.
  • Department of Administrative Services – the statewide procurement system where businesses can find contracting opportunities.  Get your product or service further than retail and walk in consumers. 
  • Government Contract Assistance Program – provides FREE help bidding and proposing on those government contracting opportunities
  • Department of Human Services-Oregon Health Authority – we buy goods and services, provide businesses with supports and incentives such as employment solutions, and work alongside community partners for sustainable solutions.  It’s not a question of whether you fit in, but where does your business fit in?
  • ODOT – they are much more than roadways… they are industry champions that spend millions with small businesses, how can your business be one of the next ones that ODOT buys from?

2-3 Sponsors, Chamber Executive Team, Arbinger Speakers, Procurement Team EXCLUSIVE Mixer

 

You’ll receive:

  • Valuable insight from trained individuals
  • Outward Mindset Curriculum and practical implementable tools
  • Direct links to attaining contracts for increasing your revenue and how to stay on the radar for more
  • Catered Lunch on site

 

Register now at https://midwillametteleadershipsummit.eventbrite.com/

Dallas Adopt A Family

The Dallas Adopt a Family Committee would like to thank you for supporting us and taking the time to give back to our Dallas community. In 2017 over 200 families and 12 youth were adopted totaling more than 1,000 individuals, including 622 children.  

The holidays are just around the corner and we know our community needs will be high this year. If you are able, we are asking for your help to adopt a local family by providing food for a Christmas meal and gifts for each child in the home. If you are unable to shop, but would still like to adopt a family, monetary donations are welcome. We have volunteers that will take care of the shopping and wrapping for you.

In November, we will be registering families in need of assistance. As families register they will be matched with our generous donors. Donors can expect to receive their adoption packet no later than the first week of December.

If you are interested in adopting a family, please complete the online donor registration form at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/DAAFHelp  and return it to the Dallas Resource Center (182 SW Academy St. Suite 220). Donor registration must be completed and received no later than Thursday, November 29th at 5pm.

With your help, we can make this a wonderful Christmas for the families in our community.

Thank you,

 Dallas Adopt a Family Committee

 

Interested in volunteering? Simply complete the online form at the attached link above. Shopping Day will be held on Monday, December 17th, and Wrapping Day is Tuesday, December 17th.On December 19th Donors may drop off their wrapped gifts and foods. Thursday, December 20th volunteers will be assisting families as they pick up what the community has provided.

Donations are needed for wrapping paper, ribbon, tape, gift tags, laundry baskets, laundry detergent, toilet paper, and $25 Safeway and Walmart gift card. All donations can be dropped off at the Dallas Community Resource Center before December 18th.

Dallas Adopt a Family matches local families with community member, agencies, businesses, clubs, and churches who would like to “adopt” them for Christmas. Each adopted family receives food to prepare a Christmas meal and a gift for each child from ages zero to eighteen.

Dallas School District #2

The Dallas High School Sports Marketing class, Leadership class, and Cheer Team have teamed up with the Susan G Komen Foundation to help spread awareness and support for breast cancer. Dallas High School has been selected among Willamette Valley schools to represent the Breast Cancer foundation this year.

As October is Breast Cancer awareness month, they are selling “Fight Like a Girl” shirts for students, staff and anyone else who would be willing to support this cause. It is also a great opportunity to come represent at our “Pink Out” games next month.

All proceeds will go to the Susan Komen foundation to help local breast cancer survivors and their battle.

In 1980, Nancy G. Brinker promised her dying sister, Susan, that she would do everything in her power to end breast cancer forever. In 1982, that promise became the Susan G. Komen organization and the beginning of a global movement. What was started with $200 and a shoebox full of potential donor names has now grown into the world’s largest nonprofit source of funding for the fight against breast cancer. To date, they have invested more than $2.9 billion in groundbreaking research, community health outreach, advocacy and programs in more than 60 countries. Their efforts helped reduce deaths from breast cancer by 38 percent between 1989 to 2014 and they won’t stop until their promise is fulfilled.

Susan G. Komen has transformed how the world treats and talks about this disease and have mobilized the largest and most passionate community. Since 1982, they have funded more than $988 million in research, more than $2.2 billion in education, screening, and treatment, serving millions worldwide.

The combination of science, education and direct help to people facing breast cancer has led to a 39 percent decline in mortality since 1989. Komen has funded more breast cancer research over their history than any other nonprofit to date. Komen focuses on supporting those with the fewest resources; uninsured, under-insured and low-income women and men unable to access care. Komen and grantees educate people about breast cancer where they live, work, play, and pray to empower them with information they need to make informed breast care decisions for themselves and as they advocate for others.

To order a shirt, please use the following link: https://dallaspinkpromo.itemorder.com

Tuesday on the Square

Our next and last Tuesday on the Square is quickly approaching on September 18th. Dallas became a HEAL city of Oregon a few years ago and, with that in mind, it is the inspiration for our next Tuesday on the Square.

The HEAL Cities campaign is a partnership between the League of Oregon Cities and the Oregon Public Health Institute, made possible with generous support from Kaiser Permanente.

Oregonians want to eat better, move more, and feel energized to do the things that they love. However, in many cities, wholesome food and opportunities for regular physical activity are out of reach for most or all of those who live or work there.

The HEAL Cities Campaign is a resource to help civic leaders create healthy communities. They know what works: city policies that expand options for every person to be physically active and to have affordable and convenient access to wholesome foods, as well as policies that build a culture of wellness for municipal employees. With generous funding from Kaiser Permanente, the HEAL Cities Campaign intends to invite every city to take the next step towards health and livability. Through their funding Dallas was able to install our new Pickle ball Courts, with plans for further additions in the future.

The Campaign has three components. First, it educates about the impact our built environment and food environment have on our health, emphasizing the status quo presents serious health risk to children.

Second, the Campaign offers alternatives. Campaign staff have compiled a library of model policies and best practices in use by cities around the country to create more options for active living, healthy eating, and workplace wellness. This policy menu is updated on a regular bases to provide as many options as possible.

Third, because each city is unique, the Campaign provides free technical assistance to help each city identify, adopt and implement the policies that are right for its community. Drawing on the expertise of Campaign partners the Oregon Public Health Institutes and the League of Oregon Cities, the Campaign is well-prepared to help Dallas expand the healthy options we offer.

Join us on the square Tuesday, September 18th as the city features our local gyms, studios, and all things health. Dallas works hard to ensure that its citizens are aware of what healthy options are available to the community. There will be food, and bouncy houses for children to enjoy as you explore what “the healthiest downtown in America” can offer.

Tailwinds and Flawed Theories of Self

“This is sort of a rambling post, so buckle up and get a death grip on your coffee, because I’m not sure where this is going either…

I saw someone write on Instagram recently that they feel like they have progressed in eight years what “any other reasonably fit person” could do in eight to ten months of training. I found I recognized myself in that comment, and also I found that I wished I knew the person better so that I could grab them by the shoulders and give them a good shake. It’s taken me a long time to stop feeling like everyone else who dedicated themselves to learning to ride a bike would be faster than me. After my first year of racing, I was able to turn that thought process in a positive (ish), much like the person I’m quoting here did — they talked about how they loved the process and how they had learned so much, etc., etc. But there was a still a tone of negativity in there, one that I was able to detect probably only because I once wrote nearly exactly the same damn post.

The way I coped with my belief that as this person put it, “any reasonably fit person” would be faster than me was not entirely unhealthy. I adopted a mentality of radical acceptance — you have no talent, I told myself, but that’s okay because you’re willing to work harder. You have no experience, but you’re willing to learn. Talent and experience don’t mean anything, if you’re willing to fail. Everything is going to be harder for you than it is for other people, but you will persevere.

So, not all bad. I mean, this attitude helped me through a lot of really difficult and frustrating seasons. After all, was I wildly and immediately talented at racing enduro? No, definitely not, and my ideas of embracing being bad at things and not caring about failure and being open to learning — all of those were good things. All of those ideas made me better. But at the base there was a problem. My whole theory was built on a shitty (and untrue) foundation. When I was positive and writing a blog post it came out like “you’re not talented, but it’s not about talent anyway” but when I was having a bad day or struggling with a trail or unsatisfied with my race results, it sounded a hell of a lot more like “you suck and everything is harder for you, you suck and everyone is better than you without even trying.”

So when I read this person’s instagram post, I couldn’t help but read between the lines and see “deep down I don’t think much of myself but look, I’ve turned it into a positive and I’ve used the whole ‘not thinking much of myself’ as a catalyst and an inspiration and look how far I’ve come despite the fact that at the end of the day I think that I suck.”

Here’s the thing — it’s good to be able to turn a bad thing (i.e. not having prodigious amount of talent) into a good thing ( a stronger work ethic). The problem is when it becomes a narrative about who you are. The problem is when it becomes a coping mechanism, a shield, a way of avoiding actually being your best self. The problem is when it’s not just an objective assessment (hey I’m not that talented but it’s cool), but rather an emotional, vitriolic attack on yourself (“you suck”). When that’s the case it doesn’t matter how you package it — it’s a big problem.

No, I didn’t come into mountain bike racing with a prodigious talent or loads of experience in a similar sport. But I had (and have) other advantages, ones that were often forgotten while I was busy explaining to everyone how little talent I had, while I was busy explaining away my mistakes and failures by saying ” well, I suck.” It’s a typical problem — as humans, we are quick to notice the wind in our face, and quick to take our tailwinds for granted.

When I read this person’s post, I thought a few things:

  1. Just like we are quicker to notice our headwinds, we are also finely tuned to notice the people who are faster/better/stronger than us. So when this person wrote “any reasonably fit person,” they were probably looking at just a select few anomalies — a handful of people they knew who had progressed insanely quickly. They probably forgot about all the people who showed up at the gym a handful of times and then quit. “Reasonably fit person” probably did not encompass every person who had ever run a mile or held a dumbbell over their heads. If it did, the perspective might be quite different.
  2. Eight years is a long time. Most people won’t work on something for eight years, especially if they don’t immediately have success. So yeah, maybe a lot of people out there COULD beat you if they trained solidly for 8-10 months, but they won’t. So who cares? Sometimes the hardest part is getting started, and even if there are a lot of potentially talented people who never got started (or quit before they really got anywhere) well, who cares? It doesn’t matter what other people could achieve, it matters what you do achieve.
  3. And ultimately, you’re doing something awesome, so keep doing the awesome thing and stop thinking about everybody else.”

– Syd

https://www.sydschulz.com/mountain-biking/tailwinds-and-flawed-theories-of-self

 

Dallas Rotary Club

Dallas Rotary Club is more than a service organization that’s making a difference in your community. They are an international membership organization made up of people who share a passion for and commitment to enhancing communities and improving lives across the world. The difference they make starts with their members.

With more than 1.2 million members in clubs in almost every country, they are improving communities around the world. As a member of Rotary, they have opportunities to change lives locally and to connect with other clubs to work on international projects that address today’s most pressing humanitarian challenges, including fighting disease, providing clean water, supporting education, and promoting peace.

Their largest and proudest effort to date is their work to eradicate polio. They initiated the audacious polio eradication campaign in 1979, by vaccinating children in the Philippines. With the help of their partners, they have since reduced polio cases worldwide by 99.9 percent.

They are problem solvers working together to achieve a better world. Their members are deeply ingrained in the communities in which they live and serve, affording them insight into local challenges and access to the leaders, resources, and networking opportunities needed to strategize and take action to make lasting change.

As Rotary members they hold themselves to the highest ethical standards. Community members, community leaders, and other organizations see them out because they know they can trust the Dallas Rotary to be effective partners and deliver on their promises.

Rotary clubs reflect the diversity of their communities and the breadth of viewpoints that comes from their members’ varied professional and personal experiences. For more than 100 years, they have been applying different perspectives to create innovative, sustainable solutions that address the needs and challenges affecting their communities.

Harnessing their unique perspectives and ideas gives the Dallas Rotary Club a shared purpose – one that compels them to take action. They roll up their sleeves, leverage their personal relationships with local partners and businesses, and apply their leadership skill as a way to get the job done and bring to life the changes they envision.

The impact their members make takes shape at Rotary club meetings and activities. These gatherings allow you to join other passionate, visionary women and men regularly to discuss and act upon community needs. Rotary club meetings are also a place to strengthen connections to friends and neighbors and form meaningful relationships that last a lifetime.

Just a Rotary helps you invest in your community, it gives you an opportunity to invest in yourself. Many clubs offer continuous learning opportunities, with a broad range of workshops, conferences, guest speakers, and more – all aimed at helping you grow personally and professionally.

Connect with a Rotary Club today. Rotary members join clubs by invitation. With 35,000 clubs around the world, and others that meet online, Rotary makes it easy to get involved and start making a difference today. Be a part of the Rotary difference. Bring your passion, your perspective, and your purpose to Rotary. To connect with a club in your area and learn more, visit them at www.rotary.org/join.

Book Review – The 5 Levels of Leadership

From where I’m sitting we’re all leaders, in different capacities.  With that in mind, we can all use a boost in how we go about leading in our realm.  Many of us have at least heard of leadership guru John C. Maxwell.  In fact for many people when they think of information about becoming a good leader, they think of things that Maxwell has said or written.  Not sounding familiar?  That’s ok.  I’d like to introduce you to him and one of my favorite books he’s written.  “The 5 Levels of Leadership”.

In this book, Maxwell dispels the myth that position or title equals leadership.  True leaders are those who stand for something great and do things in line with a greater cause.  Maxwell shares that the five levels include:

  1. Position – People follow because they have to. You’ve been given a title that says you’re the boss.
  2. Permission – People follow because they want to. People have enough buy-in on you as leader they voluntarily go where you lead them.
  3. Production – People follow because of what you have done for the organization. Your actions have proven to your followers that you are worth following.
  4. People Development – People follow because of what you have done for them personally. You’ve put enough into developing others that people value your leadership as a developer of people as well as processes.
  5. Personhood – People follow because of who you are and what you represent. Your character has stood the test of time and has been refined like gold and has proven to be of high value.

Consider this book for your next investment into your business library.  For me, it showed me the level of leader I am now and what I’m capable of becoming.  For you maybe something else.  But there’s something there for sure to get that boost to reaching new potential in leadership capabilities.