Tribes by Seth Godin

In a crowded marketplace, fitting in is a failure. In a busy marketplace, not standing out is the same as being invisible.

Since it was first published almost a decade ago, Seth Godin’s visionary book has helped tens of thousands of leaders turn a scattering of followers into a loyal tribe. If you need to rally fellow employees, customers, investors, believers, hobbyists, or readers around an idea, this book will demystify the process.

It is human nature to seek out tribes, be they religious, ethnic, economic, political, or even musical (think of the Deadheads).  Now the Internet has eliminated the barriers of geography, cost, and time. Social media gives anyone who wants to make a difference the tools to do so.

With his signature wit and storytelling flair, Godin presents the three steps to building a tribe: the desire to change things, the ability to connect a tribe, and the willingness to lead.

If you think leadership is for other people, think again—leaders come in surprising packages. Consider Joel Spolsky and his international tribe of scary-smart software engineers. Or Gary Vaynerhuck, a wine expert with a devoted following of enthusiasts. Chris Sharma led a tribe of rock climbers up impossible cliff faces, while Mich Mathews, a VP at Microsoft, ran her internal tribe of marketers from her cube in Seattle.

Tribes will make you think—really think—about the opportunities to mobilize an audience that are already at your fingertips. It’s not easy, but it’s easier than you think.

Innovate Dallas – Partnering Schools and Community for Growth

The best way to ensure our kids are the leaders of tomorrow is to allow them to be leaders today!

Innovate Dallas is about bringing our schools, community, and businesses together to instill the skills and mindsets of innovation that are needed to drive economic growth in our region.

Innovate Dallas has received a matching grant from Oregon Community Foundation to assist in connecting Dallas students to real community centered problems to both enhance deeper learning and to develop leadership capacity.

To prepare the next generation of leaders able to solve our most pressing problems, the Construct Foundation builds and facilitates design challenges known as Breaker Challenges that introduce young people to a prototype-driven method for innovation.  For an example of a Breaker Challenge see this link The Future of Food.

In every challenge, we teach the tools of design and entrepreneurship and task young people with building solutions to a real problem.

THE PROBLEM
Residents at the Dallas Retirement Village are divided into 3 groups based on the level of care that they require, Independent Living, Assisted Living, and Health Services. As residents move through the levels of care they become increasingly isolated from their preferred lifestyle, activities, and circle of friends.

In this Wellness and Aging design challenge we ask a team of students to identify, design, and test new and novel ways to increase joy and connectedness for the residents of the Dallas Retirement Village Community.

Our kids are assets in our community and this Breaker Challenge is our first of many examples to prove this. Our business community’s support in this activity points toward believing in the future of Dallas as a vibrant community that values innovation for growth in schools, business and sense of community as a whole.

Please help us reach our goal of $6,000 to develop this innovative model of learning.

If you have questions please reach out to Jamie Richardson at LaCreole Middle School

email – jamie.richardson@dsd2.org

phone – 503-623-6662

Shop Local

  1. Learn About Local Businesses

To learn more about local businesses in your area, set aside a day to explore your town and see what it has to offer. Since part of the benefit of shopping local comes from being able to run errands on foot, leave your car at home and focus on the area within walking distance, if possible.

Start at one end of the main street or one corner of the central shopping district and work your way along, making note of all the businesses you see along the way. When you see one that looks useful or interesting, stop and make a note of its name, its location, and its hours. Then, the next time you’re looking for a jewelry shop, for example, you’ll know exactly where to find one.

 

  1. Shop Locally

Once you’ve identified local businesses in your area, the next step is to make shopping at them part of your usual routine. This can be a challenge if you’re on a tight budget, since local businesses often can’t match the low prices of big-box stores. However, there are several ways to get around this problem:

  • Budget for it. Set aside a small sum in your personal budget each month specifically for local shopping.
  • Go local for services. Goods are often cheaper at big-box stores that sell cheap, mass-produced wares. However, services are often just as cheap or even cheaper when you buy them locally.
  • Shop local for the holidays. Shopping local is a great choice for holiday gifts, because a present feels more special when it comes from your own hometown. Each year, American Express sponsors “Small Business Saturday” after Thanksgiving to encourage people to start their holiday shopping at local businesses, and many independent businesses offer special sales on this day.

 

  1. Eat Locally

Not all local businesses are useful to everyone. For instance, a children’s clothing store isn’t of much interest if you don’t have kids. However, everybody has to eat, so shopping locally for food is one of the best ways to support your local economy.

 

  1. Bank Locally

Another way to keep your money in your community is to literally keep your money at a local community bank or credit union, rather than at a large national bank. Banking locally offers several benefits: lower cost, better service, and supporting your local community.

MV Advancements

It is our mission to help adults with disabilities through our innovative approaches and caring responsive staff which allows us to serve hundreds of clients through an ever-evolving set of services. Our Employment Services match business needs with individuals’ strengths and capacities, resulting in a long-term win-win for both the employer and the employee. Our retention rate last year was 86%. That means that 86% of the individuals we found jobs for last year, are still working there today!

MV Advancements is proud to report that in the last two months we have helped over 15 pre-screened job seekers find perfectly matched jobs in Polk, Marion, and Yamhill Counties. MV Advancements in the last 3 months has restructured their employment division, expanded the Dallas division and have hired over 5 full time employees in since September of 2018. We are presently partnering with local businesses and cultivating new relationships in our communities so that we can a valuable resource to the staffing needs of all local businesses in the area. We change lives every day.

If you would like more information on how we can help you, please contact Steven Scherer at 503-751-3040 or at SScherer@mvadvancements.org. We encourage you to take a moment and go to our webpage to learn more.

https://mvadvancements.org/about/updates/

Identity Theft Prevention at the Office

Do not share your login credentials.

Not with the public, your coworkers, or even the Service Desk. What happens while you are logged in is your responsibility.

Change default passwords.

Always change standard or factory passwords immediately. This applies to company-issued cell phones, PCs, email services, voicemail, FTP servers, members-only websites, routers, etc. Check your password strength at www.howsecureismypassword.net. Never use the same password on multiple sites.

Do not use your person email for business.

Or it may be subject to management scrutiny and public records requests. Don’t forward business emails to your personal email. Likewise, do not use your business email for personal use.

Do not use your personal business email to correspond with clients.

Instead of first.lastname@oregon.gov, use a generic email, such as info.dcbs@oregon.gov, especially if a client is belligerent. In some cases, you may want to use your first name only. Check with you manager.

Avoid putting confidential information in email chains and group emails.

“As much as necessary, as little as possible.” Best practice: truncate Social Security Numbers and medical records in your communication. Even better: Use a generic ID, such as a policy account, or case number.

Track and report incidents

“Incident” definition: Confidential information is disclosed to a person not authorized to see it, or used for an unauthorized purpose. Internal and external reporting may be required, e.g., to the client, your manager, administrator, CIO, Attorney General’s office, or credit reporting agencies.

If you telecommute, don’t use personally-owned devices for business.

E.g., PCs, fax, printer, cell phone, text messaging. This opens up your devices to public records requests and searches by management, even if you have a BYOD agreement. If prosecution ensues, your device could be seized as evidence. Talk to your manager if you don’t have the tools you need. Is your family home? Remember, they’re not authorized to see or overhear confidential information.

Keep confidential information safe during transport

Confidential information transported in vehicles by employees should be logged, inventoried, kept locked and out of-sight when the employee is not in the vehicle. Use point-to-point receipt for mailing if necessary (UPS, FedEx). Use tamper-proof packaging. Always ship password separately from encrypted media.

Let clients know what the agency will and won’t do with their data.

“Privacy involves each individual’s right to decide when and whether to share personal information, how much information to share, and the particular circumstances under which that information can be shared. Privacy is more than security, however, and includes the principles of transparency, notice, and choice.”

Meet with clients in transparent settings.

Don’t let conversations be overheard by fellow clients, coworkers, etc. Stay within view of others. Be aware of appearances. Be safe.

Dallas School District is Seeking Public Input on the Naming of Two Facilities

Oakdale Heights Multi-Purpose Room

Name after: Ian Tawney

Ian Tawney grew up in Dallas and attended Oakdale, and graduated from DHS in 2003. He enlisted in the Marines, and served honorably in Iraq and Afghanistan until his death in combat on October 16, 2010.

Community member Request: Our kids deserve heroes. I believe it would be most fitting to provide present and future Oakdale students with the chance to become better acquainted with Ian. They need to learn about people who spend their life giving more than they take. People that make themselves better by lifting up the people around them. They need to understand that true courage is not the lack of fear, but in doing what must be done even when you are afraid.

Please send your input by March 29th to michelle.johnstone@dsd2.org

 

Dallas High School Track

Name after: Paul and Judee Ward

Community member request: The Ward’s have made a noteworthiness and significant contribution to DHS athletics. Paul has been a two-time DHS Head track and field coach and long-time assistant coach whose career spanned nearly sixty years. Paul’s dedication to Dallas High School athletics is legendary with his influence going beyond just coaching. It includes imparting his knowledge on to several other coaches over the years, and keeping kids involved no matter what their particular life situations happen to be. Paul was a major advocate for student athletes going through difficult life changes and seeing to it that they had the same opportunity to participate as others. Both the Wards have made tremendous impact on all athletic programs by donating funding, building materials, equipment, and literally thousands of hours toward facility improvements at time when the district lacked the funding and personnel to put toward maintaining aging facilities. Paul and Judee Ward have held a high level dedication for the track program year in and out for several decades.

Please send your input by March 29th to Tim.Larson@dsd2.or

Is the Chamber a Government Entity?

A Chamber of Commerce, or a Board of Trade, is a form of business network. The Chamber of Commerce is a local organization of businesses whose goal is to further the interests of businesses. Business owners in towns and cities form these local societies to advocate on behalf of the business community. Local businesses are members, and they elect a board of directors, or executive council to set policy for the chamber. The board or council then hires a President, CEO, or Executive Director, plus staffing of an appropriate size to run the organization.

A Chamber of Commerce is a voluntary association of business firms belonging to different trades and industries. They serve as spokesmen and representatives of the business community. They differ from city to city, and region to region.

In many areas Chambers of Commerce are a source of private sector information. The information is usually gathered by surveying Chamber members. This can be used by official governmental departments as a guide to the performance of the economy in the Chambers area.

As a non-governmental institution, a Chamber of Commerce has no direct role in the writing and passage of laws and regulations that affect businesses. It may however, lobby in an attempt to get laws passed that are favorable to businesses.

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Community Awards Banquet

Save the date for Community Awards Banquet 2019! This year marks the 62nd Anniversary of the Dallas Area Chamber of Commerce hosting the Annual Community Awards Banquet. This event is a time for us to come together as a community to recognize, honor, and thank those individuals and businesses that have made an impact on our community!

These are individuals that have earned their recognition through volunteerism and by dedicating their lives, and businesses to the betterment of Dallas and all of its citizens. We are honored to be able to join with other citizens in our community to recognize and thank these wonderful, and special individuals.

The Ceremony will be held Friday, February 22nd at the Majestic in downtown Dallas beginning at 6 pm for a cocktail hour, sponsored by MAK Metals. We look forward to celebrating Dallas’ generosity and collaboration with you.

This Year’s Award Winners

  • Business of the Year – Grandma’s Attic
  • Young Professional of the Year – Britneigh Hammill
  • Junior First Citizen – Aubrey Miller
  • Outstanding Organization – Kindness Club
  • First Citizen – Pete McDowell
  • Lifetime Achievement Award – Jim Fairchild

Purchase your tickets today, and we are look forward to seeing you there! https://dallasoregon.org/awards/

A special thank you to our sponsors:

Award Sponsors

Cocktail Hour Sponsor

Catering Sponsor

Decorating Sponsor

Gold Sponsor

Silver Sponsor

Sweepstakes Sponsor

Bronze Sponsor
Willamette Valley Fiber

Table Sponsor
Chemeketa Community College
The City of Dallas
Oregon State Credit Union

Music Sponsor
Grand Hotel

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How To Combat Burnout

Even if you love your job, it’s common to feel burnt out from time to time. Perhaps you just wrapped up a big project and are having trouble mustering motivation for the next one. It could be that your home life is taking up more of your energy than usual. Or maybe, you’re just bored.

Burnout – the mental and physical exhaustion you experience when the demands of your work consistently exceed the amount of energy you have available – has been called the epidemic of the modern workplace. So you need to find ways to “put gas back in your tank.” Here are some ideas for how to do that:

  1. Take breaks during the workday. Take a walk or go for a run. Have lunch away from your desk. But take your breaks at the right time. When our energy is highest – often in the morning – you should focus on work and maximize your productivity. Tackle your toughest challenges at those times, then step away for a rest.
  2. Put away your digital devices. Place your smartphone in a basket or drawer when you arrive home so you’re not tempted to pick it up and check your email; or you might devise a rule for yourself about turning it off past 8 pm.
  3. Do something interesting. Instead of concentrating on limiting or avoiding work in your off-hours, do an activity you find interesting. Even if that activity is taxing, like a sport, it is better for you than simply relaxing.
  4. Take long weekends. The break does not need to be a two-week vacation, it could be as simple as a three, or four day weekend. While you’re away, though, don’t call the office, or check your email.
  5. Focus on meaning. If your job responsibilities preclude immediate time off try focusing on why the work matters to you. Connecting your current assignment to a larger personal goal will help you fight the temptation to slack off. However, this may provide only temporary relief.

Make sure it’s really burnout. If none of these strategies work, you could be dealing with something more serious. If you’re listless and fatigued but still feel effective on the whole, then it’s probably just burnout. However, if you feel as though you’re not making progress and that the work you do doesn’t seem to matter, it’s a different problem

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Oregon State Credit Union 2018 Philanthropy

Oregon State Credit Union’s 2018 philanthropic effort will exceed $217,000 in donations and sponsorships as well as more than 7,900 hours of volunteerism conducted by the current staff of 248.

The team performed 87 percent of the hours on their own time including 27 employees who dedicated a late October Saturday to assist in the set-up of the traditional Pastega Lights display enjoyed by tens of thousands during the Holidays at the Benton County Fairgrounds. The credit union also conducted its three annual community shred days in Albany, Corvallis and Keizer taking in 25 tons of sensitive documents from 1,727 motorists who also donated dollars and food to the local area food shares.

The credit union has dedicated dollars to the local Children’s Miracle Network facilities at Doernbecher in Portland and Peace Health in Eugene for seven straight years. With the 2018 check of $32,000, that total now stands at $163,000.

Approximately 180 schools and nonprofits located within the credit union’s 24-county field of membership in Oregon benefited from the credit union’s 2018 philanthropic effort. The total also included capital project gifts to the Corvallis Boys and Girls Club, ABC House, Linn Benton Community College and multi-year annual commitments to the Oregon State University College of Business.

The credit union supports scholarships established at the universities and community colleges in our counties with branch presence including OSU, Western Oregon University, Linn-Benton, Oregon Coast and Chemeketa community colleges. In addition, the credit union has a long established Tomorrow’s Leaders Today scholarship program that is now in its 20th year and has awarded 191 scholarships to high school seniors on their way to a college or university in the state of Oregon. That program currently selects ten recipients for scholarships of $2,000 each. Education grants awarded to schools through teacher online requests totaled $15,000 benefitting 6,906 students in our field of membership.

Oregon State Credit Union is a member-owned, not-for-profit financial cooperative serving 24 western and central Oregon counties. Additional credit union information including detail of this philanthropy and volunteerism is available at oregonstatecu.com.

 

https://www.oregonstatecu.com/dallas-oregon-branch

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