Chamber Luncheon: Dino Venti

Good, clean food is Venti Restaurants commitment to finding the best ingredients – locally and regionally sourced and raised with respect for the environment, animals and farmers – to serve to you. “Their community.” As a family-owned restaurant, they understand the importance of quality ingredients. For two decades they have striven to fill your plates with all-natural products.

The utilization of a farm-to-table concept with their produce allows Venti to offer products rich in nutrients and all the natural benefits of fresh products from hard working people here in our community. Their proteins are carefully selected with diligence and understanding of the necessity of freshness and cleanliness. The seafood found at Ventis is the highest of quality and all wild caught from the Pacific Northwest. They make an effort to accommodate dietary needs and the pursuit of healthy products by offering many gluten free friendly, vegetarian, and vegan options. They accomplish this by creating and producing many of their products with fresh ingredients in their facilities. This process allows them to eliminate chemicals, additives, preservatives, hormones, GMOs, MSG and potentially harmful products from our food.

Venti moved from their original location in the Reed Opera House in the summer of 2008. Their downtown Salem location is bigger and allows for a full kitchen and a full basement bar. They like to say they “crossed the road.”

While they serve lots of meatless and gluten free options, chicken teriyaki is the core of their offerings – the original rice bowl at the Reed Opera House was served with skewered chicken. By Dino Venit’s account, he has prepped 50 tons of chicken. In honor of the feat they redesigned their logo to pay homage to the chicken. The rooster logo is a nod to the animal loved for its power, boldness and beauty.

Venti’s strives to carry unique micro-brews and ciders. The local beer-drinking crowd is enthusiastic and often gets to help select the next keg. Venti’s opt for Oregon and North West brews but occasionally throw something different out there.

Dino Venti, owner of Venti Restaurants, will be speaking at this month’s Chamber Luncheon on September 17th. Don’t miss as he discusses the secret to his restaurants success in our local area. Chamber Luncheon is held at Dallas Retirement Village, and doors will open at 11:45 am. We hope to see you there.

Tuesday on the Square

Our next and last Tuesday on the Square is quickly approaching on September 18th. Dallas became a HEAL city of Oregon a few years ago and, with that in mind, it is the inspiration for our next Tuesday on the Square.

The HEAL Cities campaign is a partnership between the League of Oregon Cities and the Oregon Public Health Institute, made possible with generous support from Kaiser Permanente.

Oregonians want to eat better, move more, and feel energized to do the things that they love. However, in many cities, wholesome food and opportunities for regular physical activity are out of reach for most or all of those who live or work there.

The HEAL Cities Campaign is a resource to help civic leaders create healthy communities. They know what works: city policies that expand options for every person to be physically active and to have affordable and convenient access to wholesome foods, as well as policies that build a culture of wellness for municipal employees. With generous funding from Kaiser Permanente, the HEAL Cities Campaign intends to invite every city to take the next step towards health and livability. Through their funding Dallas was able to install our new Pickle ball Courts, with plans for further additions in the future.

The Campaign has three components. First, it educates about the impact our built environment and food environment have on our health, emphasizing the status quo presents serious health risk to children.

Second, the Campaign offers alternatives. Campaign staff have compiled a library of model policies and best practices in use by cities around the country to create more options for active living, healthy eating, and workplace wellness. This policy menu is updated on a regular bases to provide as many options as possible.

Third, because each city is unique, the Campaign provides free technical assistance to help each city identify, adopt and implement the policies that are right for its community. Drawing on the expertise of Campaign partners the Oregon Public Health Institutes and the League of Oregon Cities, the Campaign is well-prepared to help Dallas expand the healthy options we offer.

Join us on the square Tuesday, September 18th as the city features our local gyms, studios, and all things health. Dallas works hard to ensure that its citizens are aware of what healthy options are available to the community. There will be food, and bouncy houses for children to enjoy as you explore what “the healthiest downtown in America” can offer.

Tailwinds and Flawed Theories of Self

“This is sort of a rambling post, so buckle up and get a death grip on your coffee, because I’m not sure where this is going either…

I saw someone write on Instagram recently that they feel like they have progressed in eight years what “any other reasonably fit person” could do in eight to ten months of training. I found I recognized myself in that comment, and also I found that I wished I knew the person better so that I could grab them by the shoulders and give them a good shake. It’s taken me a long time to stop feeling like everyone else who dedicated themselves to learning to ride a bike would be faster than me. After my first year of racing, I was able to turn that thought process in a positive (ish), much like the person I’m quoting here did — they talked about how they loved the process and how they had learned so much, etc., etc. But there was a still a tone of negativity in there, one that I was able to detect probably only because I once wrote nearly exactly the same damn post.

The way I coped with my belief that as this person put it, “any reasonably fit person” would be faster than me was not entirely unhealthy. I adopted a mentality of radical acceptance — you have no talent, I told myself, but that’s okay because you’re willing to work harder. You have no experience, but you’re willing to learn. Talent and experience don’t mean anything, if you’re willing to fail. Everything is going to be harder for you than it is for other people, but you will persevere.

So, not all bad. I mean, this attitude helped me through a lot of really difficult and frustrating seasons. After all, was I wildly and immediately talented at racing enduro? No, definitely not, and my ideas of embracing being bad at things and not caring about failure and being open to learning — all of those were good things. All of those ideas made me better. But at the base there was a problem. My whole theory was built on a shitty (and untrue) foundation. When I was positive and writing a blog post it came out like “you’re not talented, but it’s not about talent anyway” but when I was having a bad day or struggling with a trail or unsatisfied with my race results, it sounded a hell of a lot more like “you suck and everything is harder for you, you suck and everyone is better than you without even trying.”

So when I read this person’s instagram post, I couldn’t help but read between the lines and see “deep down I don’t think much of myself but look, I’ve turned it into a positive and I’ve used the whole ‘not thinking much of myself’ as a catalyst and an inspiration and look how far I’ve come despite the fact that at the end of the day I think that I suck.”

Here’s the thing — it’s good to be able to turn a bad thing (i.e. not having prodigious amount of talent) into a good thing ( a stronger work ethic). The problem is when it becomes a narrative about who you are. The problem is when it becomes a coping mechanism, a shield, a way of avoiding actually being your best self. The problem is when it’s not just an objective assessment (hey I’m not that talented but it’s cool), but rather an emotional, vitriolic attack on yourself (“you suck”). When that’s the case it doesn’t matter how you package it — it’s a big problem.

No, I didn’t come into mountain bike racing with a prodigious talent or loads of experience in a similar sport. But I had (and have) other advantages, ones that were often forgotten while I was busy explaining to everyone how little talent I had, while I was busy explaining away my mistakes and failures by saying ” well, I suck.” It’s a typical problem — as humans, we are quick to notice the wind in our face, and quick to take our tailwinds for granted.

When I read this person’s post, I thought a few things:

  1. Just like we are quicker to notice our headwinds, we are also finely tuned to notice the people who are faster/better/stronger than us. So when this person wrote “any reasonably fit person,” they were probably looking at just a select few anomalies — a handful of people they knew who had progressed insanely quickly. They probably forgot about all the people who showed up at the gym a handful of times and then quit. “Reasonably fit person” probably did not encompass every person who had ever run a mile or held a dumbbell over their heads. If it did, the perspective might be quite different.
  2. Eight years is a long time. Most people won’t work on something for eight years, especially if they don’t immediately have success. So yeah, maybe a lot of people out there COULD beat you if they trained solidly for 8-10 months, but they won’t. So who cares? Sometimes the hardest part is getting started, and even if there are a lot of potentially talented people who never got started (or quit before they really got anywhere) well, who cares? It doesn’t matter what other people could achieve, it matters what you do achieve.
  3. And ultimately, you’re doing something awesome, so keep doing the awesome thing and stop thinking about everybody else.”

– Syd

https://www.sydschulz.com/mountain-biking/tailwinds-and-flawed-theories-of-self

 

Debbie Butler – Windermere Real Estate

Dallas Area Chamber of Commerce and Visitors Center would like to congratulate and welcome Debbie Butler with Windermere Real Estate to our family. Debbie Butler is your real estate broker serving Dallas, Monmouth, and the Willamette Valley.

As your Real Estate Broker, Debbie understands that buying or selling a home is a very important time in your life. Moving, packing and important decisions affecting your future. Debbie will work diligently to make sure things go as smooth as possible while guiding you through the process. Communication is key. Rest assured Debbie will work closely with you keeping you informed during your property or home transaction. Her website is full of home staging tips and inspection information to ensure her clients are as informed as possible during the buying and selling process.

Debbie Butler is a native Oregonian who enjoys the beautiful outdoors and all the amenities the Willamette Valley has to offer. She resides in Dallas, Oregon and has had a passion for real estate since buying her first home at age 20.

Serving Dallas, Monmouth, Salem and the Willamette Valley. It would be her pleasure to help you in your next home or property transaction.

Please be sure to give a warm welcome Debbie Butler with Windermere Real Estate.

 

From my first contact with Debbie Butler, she led me confidently and professionally through the sale of my home of thirty-two years. I would, and have, recommend Debbie to anyone seeking a great support of the process of buying or selling a home.” –Jo M.

Debbie is a wonderful realtor and person. I have had the chance to know her personally now for a couple years, and when it came time for my parents to find someone with experience and knowledge helping them sell their old home and find their current one I knew that NO ONE would be a better choice than Debbie. She is patient, calm, understanding, knowledgeable and tough when it’s time to be tough. She showed nothing but kindness to my parents who are older, and listened to all their concerns as they popped up. I would and will HIGHLY recommend her to all my friends and family looking to buy property in Oregon.” – Jennifer B.

Wake Up Wednesday News: Part 2

West Valley Taphouse

West Valley Taphouse is getting ready for “Tap into Polk County”. September 14th through the 16th they will be throwing “Fresh Hop Fest” to lead into the county wide week of Polk Beer. Come down to West Valley Taphouse where they will be tapping into a new Fresh Hop IPA each day, all from local producers.

This Thursday Barley Browns Beer will be taking over the tap. West Valley Taphouse seven of their beers on tap with free merchandise and games!

St. Thomas Jazz Festival

St. Thomas is kicking off their annual Jazz Festival this Sunday, September 9th. Stroll the beautiful winery grounds of Kathken Winery, relax by the trout pond under the shade and have a family-friendly good time for three great local charities: CASA, Sable House, and Polk Community Free Clinic. King Louse and LaRhonda Steele, and Ellen Whyte with Sue Orfield with be featured for the audiences’ enjoyment. Come and support the community charities with a great time.

MV Advancements

MV Advancements continues to serve adults with disabilities, mental and physical, in our community. They strive to place adults who wish to work, who are able to work in the right position. MV Advancements will match the perfect person for you and your business, and assist with training. If you have a job opening available that you think would be a perfect fit for someone in need of a chance then contact MV Advancements.

Dallas Area Visitors Center

Dallas Area Visitors Center is preparing for our next two events: Trick or Treat and Winterfest. We are looking for vendors who would like to participate in Trick or Treat. This is a great opportunity to spend time with the families in our community, as well as get your business out there.

Winterfest is in need of a committee! If you enjoy planning events, or have some fresh ideas to bring to the table then please join us. We would love to hear from the community what they would like to see.

Please contact us with any questions or concerns you might have for either events, or business partners.

Wake Up Wednesday News: Part 1

Karma Coffee Bakery

Karma Coffee Bakery announced that renovations should be completed soon, with the goal to open October 1st! This mother-daughter team are opening a coffee shop and bakery with the goal of inspiring kindness in our community and serving the tastiest treats around. We look forward to welcoming Karma Coffee Bakery to the Dallas community, not to mention their tasty treats.

Washington Street Steakhouse and Pub

Washington Street Steakhouse and Pub has a new kitchen with a salamander! They look forward to now being able to add seafood and pastas to their menu. Keep any eye on their daily specials to see what new delicious dishes they come out with.

Vagabond Brewin will be taking over the taps on September 20th. This is in conjecture with “Fresh Hop Fest” that Dallas will be holding during Tap into Polk County. Come down and enjoy good company along with their signature beers.

Harvest CrossFit

The idea of jumping into a CrossFit class with other experienced practitioners can be intimidating. Harvest CrossFit hears you, and understands. Another Beginner Class will be kicking off this fall. This 6 week program will allow you to learn about CrossFit with other beginners! Classes will be on Monday and Wednesday at 5:30 pm. If you are interested in joining please fill out a simple survey on www.harvestcrossfit.com.

CASA

CASA has another big event coming our way, Casino Night: CASA Blanca. Come enjoy a fun evening of hors d’oeuvres, drinks, and gaming in support of Polk County’s Children. Team Casino will be running the tables with catering by Wild Pear. CASAs guest speaker is Marilyn Jones director of the State of Oregon Child Welfare Programs. This is an excellent chance for a fun date night with the money going to a terrific cause.

Family Building Blocks

Join Family Building Blocks on September 19th for their first Polk County Luncheon in Dallas! Bring your friends to enjoy a free lunch and learn more about opportunities available to families in Polk County and how you can help. To learn more, become a table captain, or sponsor the event, contact Julie Hilty.

Eat an Extra Dessert Day

September 4th is Eat an Extra Dessert Day, a day that encourages people to treat their sweet tooth with a second helping of dessert. It is unclear who created this awesome but unofficial holiday, but we think that whoever it was, deserves a big slice of cake.

An extra dessert should be eaten sometime during the course of this day. Desserts are usually a sweet course served after the end of a meal. While in the past typically this meal took place at the end of the day, in modern time’s desserts can accompany a mid-day meal as well. Desserts are also known as sweets in many part of the world.

The word “dessert” is derived from the French word “desservir”, which means “to clear the table”. Fruits and honey were probably the first sweeteners used in food, and the dawn of desserts was bolstered by the expansion of the use of sugar. Sugar was in use in India before 500 BCE, and through trade it arrived in places such as Macedonia and China over the next thousand years or so. It wasn’t until at least the 12th century that it arrived in Europe. During the Industrial Revolution desserts began being mass produced, and they were able to be processed and preserved in new ways, which increased their popularity.

Indulge yourself in a little extra dessert on this day, and inform everyone you know about this happy holiday. We are convinced that it will soon become everyone’s favorite made-up holiday. Try a dessert popular in another country, or plan a trip to one of the best dessert spots in the United States. Make your own desserts, and then share them with friends, family, and co-workers. But don’t get carried away, as to be true to the holiday, you should really only eat one extra dessert.

As with anything in life, we would recommend balance. Tomorrow balance the extra dessert with a little extra exercise. We have wonderful gyms, and activities to try here in Dallas. Try something new! Stop in a Harvest CrossFit to learn about their brand of exercise, go to a yoga class at Chateau Bianca. If classroom style is not to your liking then try one of the three gyms conveniently located downtown.

Who says you can’t have your cake and eat it to? Not us.

 

First Community Credit Union

First Community Credit Union has been serving Oregonians since 1957, and with more than $1 billion in assets and 76,000 members, today they are among the strongest credit unions in the nation. As a federally insured, not-for-profit, full-service financial institution, they are dedicated to helping their members and their communities prosper through solutions that result in financial success, as well as personalized service that focuses on transparency, simplicity, and trust. They offer all the benefits of a big financial institution, but with personalized, cost-saving services that are in your best interest. Nearly anyone can join! With minimal membership eligibility requirements, it’s easier than ever to discover the benefits of banking with First Community.

First Community’s mission statement, “We build lasting partnerships through personalized financial solutions”, is a clear and succinct portrayal of their fundamental purpose. It defines what they do and how they will achieve their vision, as a financial partner of choice in their communities, while adhering to their core values. Its execution, as seen in their financial results has brought them measurable success. Their core values are: honesty, integrity and trust, member financial success and satisfaction, community leadership and education, and employee fulfillment.

At the heart of the credit union difference is their board of directors. Unlike banks, credit unions are governed by people just like you, who work everyday jobs and value the livelihood of their communities. What makes them special is their commitment to improving the financial wellness of others. The Board of Directors is elected by a vote of the membership and responsible to represent and protect the interest of the members. Collectively the Board of Directors sets the vision and governs the credit union’s overall activity.

At First Community Credit Union, their name stands for everything they believe in. It is their priority to support the livelihood of organizations in the communities they serve and are committed to helping make them a better place to live. Since 1957, First Community has had a long-standing commitment of community support. This support has been granted multiple ways through financial contributions, volunteerism and community partnerships, just to name a few.

“Community-First” is reflective throughout the credit union as their employees generously give their time talents, and financial support to numerous non-profit agencies and community projects annually.

First American Title

First American Title Insurance appreciates the opportunity to offer you their menu of products and services. Their staff awaits your requests and inquiries. First American Title is focused on you, their customer. They study what their customers need, and create the solutions to meet them.

Since their formation in 1889, they have been dedicated to maintain the integrity of land records and delivering the information, products and services needed with a level of service that is unparalleled in the industry. The name First American Title has come to represent the best in the business. You deserve the best.

As an industry leader, it is the philosophy of First American Title to provide customers the respect they deserve and the innovative products and services they need. First American Title adheres to the highest standards of financial stability and professional responsibility.

How does a one-county abstract company evolve into a global provider of title insurance and settlement services? It consistently provides customers with the most accurate information, developed with insight and delivered with integrity. For more than a century, First American Title has focused on serving its customers with the most efficient, personalized services and products.

In addition to a comprehensive presence across the United States, First American has pioneered operations in nearly 70 countries. In 1988, First American approached Canadian officials with a request to open title insurance offices in Canada. Since that time, the company has revolutionized the way title insurance is used and viewed by Canadian consumers and lenders. With the success of its endeavors in Canada, First American used a similar business model to develop international operations around the world. First American was the first title insurance provider in Mexico, Korea, and Hong Kong, and has the leading market share in Australia and England.

Today, First American continues to explore new international opportunities, as well as work with government officials and community leaders in developing nations to help these leaders create legislation that protects landowner rights and secures a stronger local economy.

This proactive approach to service goes beyond just being a vendor, who offers products. First American understands that the only way to bring out the greatest value of the company’s products, and the customer’s business, is to partner with the customer. In response to working alongside its customers, listening to their needs and anticipating what products and services will be a good fit, First American is able to introduce solutions that will meet its customers’ current and future needs.

Come in today, and let First American Title Insurance take care of your title needs.

Western Oregon University

I recently had the distinct privilege of meeting with Western Oregon University President, Dr. Rex Fuller.  We sat in his office with a giant library of gently used books showered me with the knowledge that I was truly in Academia.  Dr. Fuller began by asking about me, but I was more curious about his University.  With Dallas holding dear our closest University I wanted to know more about this place that I have known peripherally for decades.

Without batting an eye, except to let his eyes twinkle with joy, he shared some interesting factoids about WOU.  As I sipped coffee from my marbled WOU mug I listed as this man described the pains of modern university growth but the joy and wisdom in his voice as he described how WOU is going about their building process.  He shared the pocket-sized strategic plan and these were the great things I found out about our own local University:
Together we Achieve:
Western Oregon University is a place for students to Cultivate academic success and streamlines university requirements and academic pathways to graduation.
Together we Learn:
WOU will promote academic excellence in an engaged student-focused learning environment through student, faculty, community and staff initiatives
Together we Engage:
Create meaningful opportunities for lasting partnerships with local communities and regional and global organizations.
Together we Lead:
Promote teamwork and transparency in budgeting, decision-making and the stewardship of resources
Together we Thrive:
Promote effective university stewardship of educational, environmental, financial, human and technological resources
Together we Succeed:
Promote effective university stewardship of educational, environmental, financial, human and technological resources.

For more information on getting connected to Western Oregon University please visit them online at http://www.wou.edu/.