Home Comfort

Home Comfort is available to you 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. Should an emergency arise after business hours, an answering service can dispatch a technician to your home or business to service your equipment whether it is an electric, gas, oil furnace, heat pump, boiler, or geothermal system.

You can rest assured knowing that their staff have over 50 years of combined experience in the heating and air-conditioning industry. Your comfort and satisfaction is the reason they are in business and why they serve you and your families.

Arnold Dalke founded Home Comfort, Inc in 1954. Home Comfort is the premier provider of heating, air conditioning and air purification systems in the area. In 1964, they became a Lennox dealer. In 1996, Joe and Vicki Flande purchased the business and have continued the mission of providing the highest quality of comfort for residential and commercial customers like you.

Joe was the first apprentice to start in the Mid-Valley HVAC Apprenticeship Program and today sits on the board of directors. Ben Flande, Joe’s son, grew up in the business and is now actively engaged in the daily management of the business. The Flande’s are committed to the local community and generously support local schools and community organizations.

With over 50 years of combined service and ongoing training and certifications, you can trust their staff strive to be leaders in the HVAC industry. With new technologies and solutions, the choice of which to use can get complicated. To help you choose the best solution, Home Comfort technicians are continuously trained to stay current with the new technologies being introduced to the industry and can provide the benefits of the various options.

Home Comfort gives a high priority to continuing education. They are very proud that many of their technicians have met the rigorous standards of the North American Technician Excellence (NATE) Certification Program to certify that their technicians exceeds industry standards

Their staff is trained to meet the installation and service needs of both residential and commercial equipment. They specialize in Lennox heating and air conditioning systems, Honeywell air purifications systems and Heat and Glow fireplaces. Recognizing individual preferences, they gladly service and install every brand of equipment. Home Comfort service technicians are available to you 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

Your comfort is their priority! They would be happy to discuss your heating and cooling needs and help you in any way they can.

Wake Up Wednesday News

Harvest CrossFit

The idea of jumping into a CrossFit class with other experienced practitioners can be intimidating. Harvest CrossFit hears you, and understands. Another Beginner Class will be kicking off Monday, September 24th. This 6 week program will allow you to learn about CrossFit with other beginners! Classes will be on Monday and Wednesday at 5:30 pm or Tuesday and Thursday at 7 am. If you are interested in joining please fill out a simple survey on www.harvestcrossfit.com.

 

CASA

CASA has another big event coming our way, Casino Night: CASA Blanca. Come enjoy a fun evening of hors d’oeuvres, drinks, and gaming in support of Polk County’s Children. Team Casino will be running the tables with catering by Wild Pear. CASAs guest speaker is Marilyn Jones director of the State of Oregon Child Welfare Programs. This is an excellent chance for a fun date night with the money going to a terrific cause.

 

Citizens Bank

It with a heavy heart that we prepare for Susan Morill, Branch Bank Manager, to retire. While we wish her the best, and look forward to seeing her outside of the bank we will miss her daily presence. Citizens Bank will be holding a Retirement Party for Susan on Tuesday, September 25th at 8:30 am. Please join them as they celebrate Susan’s next phase in life.

 

West Valley Tap House

West Valley Tap House will be holding Octoberfest on October 6th! Starting at 5 pm you can join them for beer, and traditional German sausage cooked on the grill. So grab you lederhosen and head down to West Valley Tap House for some fun, and good beer!

 

Dallas Area Visitors Center

We are looking for vendors who would like to participate in Trick or Treat. This is a great opportunity to spend time with the families in our community, as well as get your business out there. Trick N Treat is a unique event for our community as it is organized by the students at Morrison Campus. Come support their hard work on October 31st!

Winterfest is in need of a committee! If you enjoy planning events, or have some fresh ideas to bring to the table then please join us. We would love to hear from the community what you would like to see!

 

Dallas Area Chamber of Commerce

Mid-Willamette Valley Leadership Summit tickets are now available! On November 6th, we will gather at Dallas Retirement Village to grow as business and community leaders. We invite all leaders and their teams from the Mid-Willamette Valley to come learn how to implement proven methods for growing as a community of understanding. We will lean about having an outward mindset by an organization that has a proven method to change lives and transform organizations. In the afternoon session, we’ll hear from a procurement specialist who will share secrets to obtaining contracts to increase your business revenue.

Habitat for Humanity

Habitat for Humanity of the Mid-Willamette Valley strives to bring people together to build homes, communities and hope. They strive to see a world where everyone has a decent place to live.

Habitat for Humanity creates lasting, affordable home ownership by partnering with families who have demonstrated need for stable, affordable housing but do not qualify for a traditional mortgage. Each family contributes 500 hours of “sweat equity” (volunteer time) towards the completion of other people’s homes and their own. Habitat then sells the home to the family using a zero-interest loan.

By empowering volunteers and community organizations they make a tangible, lasting difference in our community. Many volunteers participate through Habitat for Humanity’s partnerships with faith communities, businesses and service clubs. The homes they build are tax-bearing properties. Habitat for Humanity homeowners, whose modest incomes previously left them vulnerable to frequent moves, have the opportunity to grow roots and focus on other areas of their lives such as education, professional development, and volunteerism.

Habitat for Humanity “puts faith into action” by working face-to-face in 100 countries around the world. In a world riddled with violence, Habitat for Humanity volunteers give their time and resources towards building homes and hope worldwide. Habitat for Humanity of the Mid-Willamette Valley tithes all undesignated funds to assist with international house-building.

Habitat for Humanity of the Mid-Willamette Valley recently introduced the Ramos-Gasca family. Parents –Arturo and Sara, with daughters Brianna and Jessica. Arturo works for John Mills Concrete and has been employed with them for over a decade. Sara has recently recovered from a medical condition that was a major setback to the family. Despite all this, they continue to pay their bills and responsibly handle their finances. Habitat for Humanity was proud to partner with this family because they have regularly demonstrated amazing resilience and were ready to move into home ownership.

The family was paying $900 a month for inadequate and unsafe shelter. In this residence, one room had become completely uninhabitable due to severe mold issues. In the winter poor circuitry and poor insulation push utility bill into hundreds of dollars each month. With their new Habitat home, they have brand new five-star energy rated appliances that will result in affordable utility bills.

Please join them for a complimentary breakfast on October 2, 2018. The HopeBuilder Breakfast will be held at the Salem Convention Center and is a perfect opportunity to learn more about habitat for Humanity. This year’s theme is Home is the Key.

International Talk Like A Pirate Day

Once upon a time — on June 6, 1995, to be precise — John Baur and Mark Summers were playing racquetball, not well but gamely. It wasn’t their intention to become “the pirate guys.” Truth to tell, it wasn’t really their intention to become anything, except perhaps a tad thinner and healthier. As they flailed away, they called out friendly encouragement to each other -“Damn, you bastard!” and “Oh, jeez, my hamstring!” for instance – as shots caromed away, unimpeded by their wildly swung rackets.

On this day, for reasons they still don’t quite understand, they started giving their encouragement in pirate slang. Mark suspects one of them might have been reaching for a low shot that, by pure chance, might have come off the wall at an unusually high rate of speed, and strained something best left unstrained. “Arrr!,” he might have said.

Who knows? It might have happened exactly that way.

Anyway, whoever let out the first “Arrr!” started something. One thing led to another. “That be a fine cannonade,” one said, to be followed by “Now watch as I fire a broadside straight into your yardarm!” and other such helpful phrases. By the time their hour on the court was over, they realized that lapsing into pirate lingo had made the game more fun and the time pass more quickly. They decided then and there that what the world really needed was a new national holiday, Talk Like A Pirate Day.

First, they needed a date for the holiday. As any guy can tell you, June 6 is the anniversary of World War II’s D-Day. Guys hold dates like that in reverence and awe so there was no way they could use June 6. Mark came up with September 19.

They also decided that the perfect spokesman for their new holiday was none other than Dave Barry himself, nationally syndicated humor columnist and winner of the Pulitzer Prize. So, naturally, they forgot all about it.

For seven years they celebrated International Talk Like a Pirate Day pretty much on their own, with their friend Brian Rhodes actually reminding them that the event was coming up. Frankly, they usually forgot exactly when Talk Like a Pirate Day was supposed to be or even that there was such a thing. Brian is one of those guys who programs every important event into his computer so that a reminder pops up the day before. John and Mark may be the founders of Talk Like a Pirate Day, but Brian is certainly the godfather.

Things would probably have continued indefinitely on that low-key note until John, Mark and Brian were little old pirates in the Home for Retired Sea Dogs. They had a national holiday that almost nobody knew about, and they were content with that.

Except for one happy accident. One day in early 2002, John chanced upon Dave Barry’s e-mail address. Dave Barry is syndicated columnist and the author of between four and 6,000 books and the second funniest man in the universe. They were two guys (three if you count Brian, and that seems only fair,) but Dave is like a whole parade with brass bands and elephants. They reasoned that Dave would be able to bring attention to Talk Like A Pirate Day in a way that Mark and John (and Brian) wouldn’t be able to if they lived to be 200. Ambition suddenly burned bright, and sending e-mails is a very easy thing to do. Which is why they finally got around to contacting him.

The first e-mail introduced themselves, and told him about their great idea — Talk Like a Pirate Day. They knew he wouldn’t be able to resist. Then they offered him the only thing they had, the chance to be official national spokesman for the event. They clicked the send button, casting their bread upon the water.

Surprisingly, they had an answer in a matter of days. It’s a great idea, he said, but then he asked the fatal question. “Have you guys actually DONE anything about this? Or are you counting on me to carry the ball here?”

Very perceptive of him. The way they answered would be crucial in bringing Barry aboard. They decided on the truth, with a lot of kissing up thrown in. “Well, we’ve talked like pirates every Sept. 19, and we’ve encouraged our several friends to,” John wrote in reply. And Mark put it in perspective when he wrote, “We are dinghy-sized-talk-like-a-pirate kinda guys, but you, Dave … you are like a frigate-huge-sized-talk-like-a-pirate kinda guy.”

In early September, John got a phone call from the feature editor at the local paper, someone he had worked with for several years before leaving the newspaper business. She sounded confused. “John, I was editing this week’s Dave Barry column and it’s about … Is this you?”

It was. The nationally syndicated columnist and Pulitzer Prize winning writer of “distinguished commentary” became convinced of the great potential of such a holiday. He had written the column.

Thus, International Talk Like a Pirate Day was born.

Goodwill Industries

Goodwill Industries strives to enhance the dignity and quality of life of individuals and families by helping people reach their full potential through education, skills training and the power of work.

Good will was founded in 1902 in Boston by Rev. Edgar J. Helms, a Methodist minister and early social innovator. Helms collected used household goods and clothing in wealthier areas of the city, then trained and hired those who were poor to mend and repair the used goods. The goods were then resold or were given to the people who repaired them. They system worked, and the Goodwill philosophy of “Not Charity, but a Chance” was born.

Dr. Helms’ vision set an early course for what today has become a $5.59 billion nonprofit organization. Helms described Goodwill Industries as an “industrial program as well as a social service enterprise… a provider of employment, training and rehabilitation for people of limited employability, and a source of temporary assistance for individuals whose resources were depleted.”

Times have changed, but Helms’ vision remains constant: “We have courage and are unafraid. With the prayerful cooperation of millions of our bag contributors and of our workers, we will press on till the curse of poverty and exploitation is banished from mankind.”

Goodwill meet the needs of all job seekers, including programs for youth, seniors, veterans, and people with disabilities, criminal backgrounds and other specialized needs. In 2017, Goodwill helped more than 288,000 people train for careers in industries such as banking, IT, and health care, to name a few – and get the supporting services they needed to be successful – such as English language training, additional education, or access to transportation and child care.

Goodwill Industries International is committed to inclusion and diversity and respecting the people we serve, our community members, and the people with whom we work. We believe in putting people first, providing a safe space for our employees and creating environments where people have the support they need to build their work skills and care for their families. We are proud that people from diverse backgrounds have come to Goodwill to build their skills and their career goals. We will continue this tradition of serving others and building communities that work.

Goodwill was ranked among the top five brands that inspired consumers the most with its mission in the Brand World Value Index for the past three years.

Goodwill Industries works to enhance the dignity and quality of life of individuals and families by strengthening communities, eliminating barriers to opportunity, and helping people in need reach their full potential through learning and the power of work.

First Federal Savings & Loan Association of McMinnville

When First Federal was founded nearly 100 years ago, they offered a new banking choice for Yamhill County residents. In the years since, they have grown in services and in number of branches, but their commitment to their customers and communities remains their primary focus.

First Federals mission is to provide superior banking products and services, to promote home ownership and business vitality in support of their communities. Yes, they’re here and they are staying!

First Federal pledges to help their customers identify and achieve their financial goals through exceptional service. At First Federal they strive to provide you with the best banking experience possible. They pledge to provide you with the highest level of service accuracy, respond quickly to your requests, listen to you and offer solutions, learn and use customers’ names, continually assess their performance, and always thank you for your business.

In July First Federal of McMinnville welcomed a new Board Member. Tonna Farrar, JD was selected to join the Board of Directors at First Federal. Farrar has more than two decades of legal experience, and practices in the areas of insurance bad faith, consumer litigation, equine law, disability insurance, transactional and corporate matters. For more than a decade, Farrar served as lead counsel in national banking and insurance class action litigation. She is licensed in four states and last fall opened an office in Newberg, to better serve local clients in her own community. She is the Managing Partner of TKF Law LLC in Oregon, representing business owners and individuals in the Valley. In order to serve her clients in other areas, she is also a Parner with Evangeline Fisher Grossman Law in California, and serves Of Counsel to Comitz | Beete PLLC in Arizona. She brings experience as both a banking litigation attorney and representative of local businesses. Please join us in welcoming her to First Federal.

First Federal awarded eight $1,500 scholarships to outstanding seniors in Yamhill County this year, and are pleased to recognize them for their academic achievements and involvement in their schools and communities.

A 100 years later, and First Federal is still committed to their communities. They continue to strive to serve their clients in the best ways that they can.

Dallas Glow Run

October 15th is Dallas’ 3rd Annual Glow Run!

This annual Glow Run has always been an event our community has enjoyed since day one. The first year the Glow Run was held, only 100 people were expected. Over 500 people joined in the festivities and each year they continue to grow. City of Dallas partners with national and local sponsors who want to reach hundreds of event participants and their families in an engaging and entertaining environment. With all the fun, it is no surprise that people continue to join in on the festivities year after year.

What is the Glow Run? The Glow Run is a Halloween themed glow in the dark 5k run or walk and the proceeds will go to Christmas Cheer. Dallas Christmas Cheer is a local non-profit program that provides food assistance to children and families in need over the holiday season. This is a great way to spread the holiday feeling to those in our community who are in need.

The registration deadline is Friday, October 14th at Dallas City Hall by 5:30 pm. You can also register on race day at the Academy Building between 6 pm and 7 pm. The cost to participate is $25 per a person. A team or family of four or more can expect a discount of $3 per a participants so gather everyone you know, however you must turn in forms together.

The 5k course will start and finish at the Academy Building in historic downtown Dallas, corner of Main St and Academy St. The course will consist of a mix of paved and trail surfaces through Dallas City Park. Runners will receive a head lamp, glow stick, and glow paint. The City Park will be decorated for the event by local community businesses, and will have a foam machine waiting at the finish line as no good race ends clean. Dress up and have fun. Costumes are encouraged!

If you have any questions, wish to sponsor, decorate, or participate you can click on the link below for more information. You can also reach Sheila Pierce at City Hall.

 

https://www.ci.dallas.or.us/838/Glow-Run

Chamber Luncheon: Dino Venti

Good, clean food is Venti Restaurants commitment to finding the best ingredients – locally and regionally sourced and raised with respect for the environment, animals and farmers – to serve to you. “Their community.” As a family-owned restaurant, they understand the importance of quality ingredients. For two decades they have striven to fill your plates with all-natural products.

The utilization of a farm-to-table concept with their produce allows Venti to offer products rich in nutrients and all the natural benefits of fresh products from hard working people here in our community. Their proteins are carefully selected with diligence and understanding of the necessity of freshness and cleanliness. The seafood found at Ventis is the highest of quality and all wild caught from the Pacific Northwest. They make an effort to accommodate dietary needs and the pursuit of healthy products by offering many gluten free friendly, vegetarian, and vegan options. They accomplish this by creating and producing many of their products with fresh ingredients in their facilities. This process allows them to eliminate chemicals, additives, preservatives, hormones, GMOs, MSG and potentially harmful products from our food.

Venti moved from their original location in the Reed Opera House in the summer of 2008. Their downtown Salem location is bigger and allows for a full kitchen and a full basement bar. They like to say they “crossed the road.”

While they serve lots of meatless and gluten free options, chicken teriyaki is the core of their offerings – the original rice bowl at the Reed Opera House was served with skewered chicken. By Dino Venit’s account, he has prepped 50 tons of chicken. In honor of the feat they redesigned their logo to pay homage to the chicken. The rooster logo is a nod to the animal loved for its power, boldness and beauty.

Venti’s strives to carry unique micro-brews and ciders. The local beer-drinking crowd is enthusiastic and often gets to help select the next keg. Venti’s opt for Oregon and North West brews but occasionally throw something different out there.

Dino Venti, owner of Venti Restaurants, will be speaking at this month’s Chamber Luncheon on September 17th. Don’t miss as he discusses the secret to his restaurants success in our local area. Chamber Luncheon is held at Dallas Retirement Village, and doors will open at 11:45 am. We hope to see you there.

Tuesday on the Square

Our next and last Tuesday on the Square is quickly approaching on September 18th. Dallas became a HEAL city of Oregon a few years ago and, with that in mind, it is the inspiration for our next Tuesday on the Square.

The HEAL Cities campaign is a partnership between the League of Oregon Cities and the Oregon Public Health Institute, made possible with generous support from Kaiser Permanente.

Oregonians want to eat better, move more, and feel energized to do the things that they love. However, in many cities, wholesome food and opportunities for regular physical activity are out of reach for most or all of those who live or work there.

The HEAL Cities Campaign is a resource to help civic leaders create healthy communities. They know what works: city policies that expand options for every person to be physically active and to have affordable and convenient access to wholesome foods, as well as policies that build a culture of wellness for municipal employees. With generous funding from Kaiser Permanente, the HEAL Cities Campaign intends to invite every city to take the next step towards health and livability. Through their funding Dallas was able to install our new Pickle ball Courts, with plans for further additions in the future.

The Campaign has three components. First, it educates about the impact our built environment and food environment have on our health, emphasizing the status quo presents serious health risk to children.

Second, the Campaign offers alternatives. Campaign staff have compiled a library of model policies and best practices in use by cities around the country to create more options for active living, healthy eating, and workplace wellness. This policy menu is updated on a regular bases to provide as many options as possible.

Third, because each city is unique, the Campaign provides free technical assistance to help each city identify, adopt and implement the policies that are right for its community. Drawing on the expertise of Campaign partners the Oregon Public Health Institutes and the League of Oregon Cities, the Campaign is well-prepared to help Dallas expand the healthy options we offer.

Join us on the square Tuesday, September 18th as the city features our local gyms, studios, and all things health. Dallas works hard to ensure that its citizens are aware of what healthy options are available to the community. There will be food, and bouncy houses for children to enjoy as you explore what “the healthiest downtown in America” can offer.

Tailwinds and Flawed Theories of Self

“This is sort of a rambling post, so buckle up and get a death grip on your coffee, because I’m not sure where this is going either…

I saw someone write on Instagram recently that they feel like they have progressed in eight years what “any other reasonably fit person” could do in eight to ten months of training. I found I recognized myself in that comment, and also I found that I wished I knew the person better so that I could grab them by the shoulders and give them a good shake. It’s taken me a long time to stop feeling like everyone else who dedicated themselves to learning to ride a bike would be faster than me. After my first year of racing, I was able to turn that thought process in a positive (ish), much like the person I’m quoting here did — they talked about how they loved the process and how they had learned so much, etc., etc. But there was a still a tone of negativity in there, one that I was able to detect probably only because I once wrote nearly exactly the same damn post.

The way I coped with my belief that as this person put it, “any reasonably fit person” would be faster than me was not entirely unhealthy. I adopted a mentality of radical acceptance — you have no talent, I told myself, but that’s okay because you’re willing to work harder. You have no experience, but you’re willing to learn. Talent and experience don’t mean anything, if you’re willing to fail. Everything is going to be harder for you than it is for other people, but you will persevere.

So, not all bad. I mean, this attitude helped me through a lot of really difficult and frustrating seasons. After all, was I wildly and immediately talented at racing enduro? No, definitely not, and my ideas of embracing being bad at things and not caring about failure and being open to learning — all of those were good things. All of those ideas made me better. But at the base there was a problem. My whole theory was built on a shitty (and untrue) foundation. When I was positive and writing a blog post it came out like “you’re not talented, but it’s not about talent anyway” but when I was having a bad day or struggling with a trail or unsatisfied with my race results, it sounded a hell of a lot more like “you suck and everything is harder for you, you suck and everyone is better than you without even trying.”

So when I read this person’s instagram post, I couldn’t help but read between the lines and see “deep down I don’t think much of myself but look, I’ve turned it into a positive and I’ve used the whole ‘not thinking much of myself’ as a catalyst and an inspiration and look how far I’ve come despite the fact that at the end of the day I think that I suck.”

Here’s the thing — it’s good to be able to turn a bad thing (i.e. not having prodigious amount of talent) into a good thing ( a stronger work ethic). The problem is when it becomes a narrative about who you are. The problem is when it becomes a coping mechanism, a shield, a way of avoiding actually being your best self. The problem is when it’s not just an objective assessment (hey I’m not that talented but it’s cool), but rather an emotional, vitriolic attack on yourself (“you suck”). When that’s the case it doesn’t matter how you package it — it’s a big problem.

No, I didn’t come into mountain bike racing with a prodigious talent or loads of experience in a similar sport. But I had (and have) other advantages, ones that were often forgotten while I was busy explaining to everyone how little talent I had, while I was busy explaining away my mistakes and failures by saying ” well, I suck.” It’s a typical problem — as humans, we are quick to notice the wind in our face, and quick to take our tailwinds for granted.

When I read this person’s post, I thought a few things:

  1. Just like we are quicker to notice our headwinds, we are also finely tuned to notice the people who are faster/better/stronger than us. So when this person wrote “any reasonably fit person,” they were probably looking at just a select few anomalies — a handful of people they knew who had progressed insanely quickly. They probably forgot about all the people who showed up at the gym a handful of times and then quit. “Reasonably fit person” probably did not encompass every person who had ever run a mile or held a dumbbell over their heads. If it did, the perspective might be quite different.
  2. Eight years is a long time. Most people won’t work on something for eight years, especially if they don’t immediately have success. So yeah, maybe a lot of people out there COULD beat you if they trained solidly for 8-10 months, but they won’t. So who cares? Sometimes the hardest part is getting started, and even if there are a lot of potentially talented people who never got started (or quit before they really got anywhere) well, who cares? It doesn’t matter what other people could achieve, it matters what you do achieve.
  3. And ultimately, you’re doing something awesome, so keep doing the awesome thing and stop thinking about everybody else.”

– Syd

https://www.sydschulz.com/mountain-biking/tailwinds-and-flawed-theories-of-self