How To Combat Burnout

Even if you love your job, it’s common to feel burnt out from time to time. Perhaps you just wrapped up a big project and are having trouble mustering motivation for the next one. It could be that your home life is taking up more of your energy than usual. Or maybe, you’re just bored.

Burnout – the mental and physical exhaustion you experience when the demands of your work consistently exceed the amount of energy you have available – has been called the epidemic of the modern workplace. So you need to find ways to “put gas back in your tank.” Here are some ideas for how to do that:

  1. Take breaks during the workday. Take a walk or go for a run. Have lunch away from your desk. But take your breaks at the right time. When our energy is highest – often in the morning – you should focus on work and maximize your productivity. Tackle your toughest challenges at those times, then step away for a rest.
  2. Put away your digital devices. Place your smartphone in a basket or drawer when you arrive home so you’re not tempted to pick it up and check your email; or you might devise a rule for yourself about turning it off past 8 pm.
  3. Do something interesting. Instead of concentrating on limiting or avoiding work in your off-hours, do an activity you find interesting. Even if that activity is taxing, like a sport, it is better for you than simply relaxing.
  4. Take long weekends. The break does not need to be a two-week vacation, it could be as simple as a three, or four day weekend. While you’re away, though, don’t call the office, or check your email.
  5. Focus on meaning. If your job responsibilities preclude immediate time off try focusing on why the work matters to you. Connecting your current assignment to a larger personal goal will help you fight the temptation to slack off. However, this may provide only temporary relief.

Make sure it’s really burnout. If none of these strategies work, you could be dealing with something more serious. If you’re listless and fatigued but still feel effective on the whole, then it’s probably just burnout. However, if you feel as though you’re not making progress and that the work you do doesn’t seem to matter, it’s a different problem

World Cup Avicii Mac Miller Stan Lee “Black Panther” Meghan Markle AnthonyBourdain Stephen Hawking

Business Ethics

The Dallas Area Chamber of Commerce recently received an email from an involved citizen. We felt it was important to share with our community.

Good morning Mr. Shinn!

I just wanted to send the Dallas Chamber some positive feedback- a student I tutor on the weekends was working on a business project at our session, and she ended up on the chamber website… She thought you would like to know that we explored it and found excellent info for her project, so she says thank you 🙂 And- Sophia and I thought we could return the favor by sharing another educational business resource we found, so she picked one out and I told her I’d send it today… “Guide to Business Ethics” — https://onlinebusiness.northeastern.edu/neu-msf/guide-to-business-ethics/

Sophia thought it would be a good addition to the DACC’s Business toolkit page (this one https://dallasoregon.org/business-toolkit/) because “it has really helpful information on business ethics and why it’s important.” I hope you can add it-Sophia would be so proud to see that her research & contribution were helpful… and I’d love to show her at her next tutoring session 🙂 Thanks so much JD and Happy Thanksgiving!!

Sincerely,
Sophia & Miss DeCesare

The Dallas Area Chamber of Commerce strives to help grow and educate our business community. It was great to hear how our site was helpful and even more encouraging that Sophia is looking into concepts for business.

The article that Sophia was so kind to recommend discusses the importance of having a code of ethics, and how it can negatively or positively affect a business’s reputation. People want to work with companies, and with people who uphold strong ethics concerning both their customers and their employees.

Businesses will, at times, find themselves needing to validate, and assess their code of conduct. “When there is public trust in an organization’s actions, the company can succeed. And when the employees who participate in creating and sustaining the company culture believe in what the business stands for, then the company can continue to thrive from the inside out…” The Dallas Area Chamber of Commerce strongly recommends following the above link.

We are so grateful to receive feedback from young, involved citizens such as Sophia, and Edith. Thank you again Sophia for passing on this information, and to Edith for helping to educate our youth!

Mid-Willamette Valley Leadership Summit

On November 6th, from 9 am to 2 pm we will gather at Dallas Retirement Village to grow as business and community leaders. Please join us for the first Mid-Willamette Valley Leadership Summit.

What will the Summit entail?

We invite all leaders and their teams from the Mid-Willamette Valley to come learn how to implement proven methods for growing as a community of understanding.

Tickets are $77 per person.

What community doesn’t need better communication and more revenue?

We sense an urgency for increasing our region’s capacity to build relationships and increase the collective efficacy of the regional community. With that in mind, we are fulfilling our role as a community catalyst by launching the very first Mid-Willamette Valley Leadership Summit.

We will gather on November 6th, 2018, at Dallas Retirement Village, for discussion of how we as business and community leaders, can lead from the front to become a community of outward thinkers and community of understanding. Along with our capacity to work together. We will share some out of the box ways to increase revenue.

We’ll learn about having an outward mindset by an organization that has a proven method to change lives and transform organizations.

In the afternoon session, we’ll hear from a procurement specialist who will share secrets to attaining contracts to increase your business revenue.

 

Agenda:

November 6, 2018

8:30-9 Check in

9-11:45 Arbinger Institute “The Outward Mindset” –  Arbinger makes the connection between behavior, mindset, and results. They will share proven work that equips people to understand and effect change at the level of mindset to change an organization’s culture, resolve conflict, and facilitate dramatically better organizational results.

11:45-12:30 Lunch (Included in your ticket)

12:30-2 Procurement – How can your business gain resources and contracts for growth?

  • Secretary of State Small Business Advocacy Team – structuring your business, business information and assistance cutting through red tape
  • Certification Office for Business Inclusion and Diversity – the beneftis to becoming certified with the State of Oregon as a women-owned, minority-owned, service-disabled Veteran owned, or emerging small business.
  • Department of Administrative Services – the statewide procurement system where businesses can find contracting opportunities.  Get your product or service further than retail and walk in consumers. 
  • Government Contract Assistance Program – provides FREE help bidding and proposing on those government contracting opportunities
  • Department of Human Services-Oregon Health Authority – we buy goods and services, provide businesses with supports and incentives such as employment solutions, and work alongside community partners for sustainable solutions.  It’s not a question of whether you fit in, but where does your business fit in?
  • ODOT – they are much more than roadways… they are industry champions that spend millions with small businesses, how can your business be one of the next ones that ODOT buys from?

2-3 Sponsors, Chamber Executive Team, Arbinger Speakers, Procurement Team EXCLUSIVE Mixer

 

You’ll receive:

  • Valuable insight from trained individuals
  • Outward Mindset Curriculum and practical implementable tools
  • Direct links to attaining contracts for increasing your revenue and how to stay on the radar for more
  • Catered Lunch on site

 

Register now at https://midwillametteleadershipsummit.eventbrite.com/

Les Schwab Tires

It all began in 1952 with one little tire shop and a vision of bringing together service, value, and convenience for their customers.

It is about you, and it is about time. Les Schwab sets the standard for consistently exceptional customer service. Who else runs out to greet you at your car when you arrive? Their founder, Les Schwab, said, “Our business is earning your trust and we like doing that as fast as we can.”

Always improving, never changing. From flexible credit options and vehicle wellness reports to free Wi-Fi in their waiting room, they are always coming up with better ways to make things easier for you.

Creating customers for life by creating employees for life. At Les Schwab, employees are treated like partners; that is why many of them have been with Les Schwab for well over thirty years. So you will enjoy friendly, familiar faces – along with convenient free services and the best warranty in the business – for the life of your tires.

Always driven by their founder’s vision. Born in 1917 in Bend, Oregon, Les Schwab came from humble beginnings. He was a self-made man, and believed in old-fashioned hard work. Les built his business from one store to hundreds of locations across the western states, making Les Schwab one of the largest independent tire businesses in the United States.

He did not do it alone. Les valued partnership – he was married for over 70 years after all – and provided his employee’s training and opportunities to grow and succeed, both financially and personally. Les believed in treating customers like family.

Although Les passed away in 2007, his vision remains at the core of the company’s culture: give people more for their money… reward employees for their expertise and hard work… earn people’s trust and everyone benefits. Today, the 7,000 plus employees of Les Schwab Tire Centers are proud to carry on this legacy.

Keeping your life in motion. Over 65 years ago, they set the standard for tire service. Today, Les Schwab Tires continue to go out of their way to keep you on your way.

Habitat for Humanity

Habitat for Humanity of the Mid-Willamette Valley strives to bring people together to build homes, communities and hope. They strive to see a world where everyone has a decent place to live.

Habitat for Humanity creates lasting, affordable home ownership by partnering with families who have demonstrated need for stable, affordable housing but do not qualify for a traditional mortgage. Each family contributes 500 hours of “sweat equity” (volunteer time) towards the completion of other people’s homes and their own. Habitat then sells the home to the family using a zero-interest loan.

By empowering volunteers and community organizations they make a tangible, lasting difference in our community. Many volunteers participate through Habitat for Humanity’s partnerships with faith communities, businesses and service clubs. The homes they build are tax-bearing properties. Habitat for Humanity homeowners, whose modest incomes previously left them vulnerable to frequent moves, have the opportunity to grow roots and focus on other areas of their lives such as education, professional development, and volunteerism.

Habitat for Humanity “puts faith into action” by working face-to-face in 100 countries around the world. In a world riddled with violence, Habitat for Humanity volunteers give their time and resources towards building homes and hope worldwide. Habitat for Humanity of the Mid-Willamette Valley tithes all undesignated funds to assist with international house-building.

Habitat for Humanity of the Mid-Willamette Valley recently introduced the Ramos-Gasca family. Parents –Arturo and Sara, with daughters Brianna and Jessica. Arturo works for John Mills Concrete and has been employed with them for over a decade. Sara has recently recovered from a medical condition that was a major setback to the family. Despite all this, they continue to pay their bills and responsibly handle their finances. Habitat for Humanity was proud to partner with this family because they have regularly demonstrated amazing resilience and were ready to move into home ownership.

The family was paying $900 a month for inadequate and unsafe shelter. In this residence, one room had become completely uninhabitable due to severe mold issues. In the winter poor circuitry and poor insulation push utility bill into hundreds of dollars each month. With their new Habitat home, they have brand new five-star energy rated appliances that will result in affordable utility bills.

Please join them for a complimentary breakfast on October 2, 2018. The HopeBuilder Breakfast will be held at the Salem Convention Center and is a perfect opportunity to learn more about habitat for Humanity. This year’s theme is Home is the Key.

Chamber Luncheon: Dino Venti

Good, clean food is Venti Restaurants commitment to finding the best ingredients – locally and regionally sourced and raised with respect for the environment, animals and farmers – to serve to you. “Their community.” As a family-owned restaurant, they understand the importance of quality ingredients. For two decades they have striven to fill your plates with all-natural products.

The utilization of a farm-to-table concept with their produce allows Venti to offer products rich in nutrients and all the natural benefits of fresh products from hard working people here in our community. Their proteins are carefully selected with diligence and understanding of the necessity of freshness and cleanliness. The seafood found at Ventis is the highest of quality and all wild caught from the Pacific Northwest. They make an effort to accommodate dietary needs and the pursuit of healthy products by offering many gluten free friendly, vegetarian, and vegan options. They accomplish this by creating and producing many of their products with fresh ingredients in their facilities. This process allows them to eliminate chemicals, additives, preservatives, hormones, GMOs, MSG and potentially harmful products from our food.

Venti moved from their original location in the Reed Opera House in the summer of 2008. Their downtown Salem location is bigger and allows for a full kitchen and a full basement bar. They like to say they “crossed the road.”

While they serve lots of meatless and gluten free options, chicken teriyaki is the core of their offerings – the original rice bowl at the Reed Opera House was served with skewered chicken. By Dino Venit’s account, he has prepped 50 tons of chicken. In honor of the feat they redesigned their logo to pay homage to the chicken. The rooster logo is a nod to the animal loved for its power, boldness and beauty.

Venti’s strives to carry unique micro-brews and ciders. The local beer-drinking crowd is enthusiastic and often gets to help select the next keg. Venti’s opt for Oregon and North West brews but occasionally throw something different out there.

Dino Venti, owner of Venti Restaurants, will be speaking at this month’s Chamber Luncheon on September 17th. Don’t miss as he discusses the secret to his restaurants success in our local area. Chamber Luncheon is held at Dallas Retirement Village, and doors will open at 11:45 am. We hope to see you there.

Tailwinds and Flawed Theories of Self

“This is sort of a rambling post, so buckle up and get a death grip on your coffee, because I’m not sure where this is going either…

I saw someone write on Instagram recently that they feel like they have progressed in eight years what “any other reasonably fit person” could do in eight to ten months of training. I found I recognized myself in that comment, and also I found that I wished I knew the person better so that I could grab them by the shoulders and give them a good shake. It’s taken me a long time to stop feeling like everyone else who dedicated themselves to learning to ride a bike would be faster than me. After my first year of racing, I was able to turn that thought process in a positive (ish), much like the person I’m quoting here did — they talked about how they loved the process and how they had learned so much, etc., etc. But there was a still a tone of negativity in there, one that I was able to detect probably only because I once wrote nearly exactly the same damn post.

The way I coped with my belief that as this person put it, “any reasonably fit person” would be faster than me was not entirely unhealthy. I adopted a mentality of radical acceptance — you have no talent, I told myself, but that’s okay because you’re willing to work harder. You have no experience, but you’re willing to learn. Talent and experience don’t mean anything, if you’re willing to fail. Everything is going to be harder for you than it is for other people, but you will persevere.

So, not all bad. I mean, this attitude helped me through a lot of really difficult and frustrating seasons. After all, was I wildly and immediately talented at racing enduro? No, definitely not, and my ideas of embracing being bad at things and not caring about failure and being open to learning — all of those were good things. All of those ideas made me better. But at the base there was a problem. My whole theory was built on a shitty (and untrue) foundation. When I was positive and writing a blog post it came out like “you’re not talented, but it’s not about talent anyway” but when I was having a bad day or struggling with a trail or unsatisfied with my race results, it sounded a hell of a lot more like “you suck and everything is harder for you, you suck and everyone is better than you without even trying.”

So when I read this person’s instagram post, I couldn’t help but read between the lines and see “deep down I don’t think much of myself but look, I’ve turned it into a positive and I’ve used the whole ‘not thinking much of myself’ as a catalyst and an inspiration and look how far I’ve come despite the fact that at the end of the day I think that I suck.”

Here’s the thing — it’s good to be able to turn a bad thing (i.e. not having prodigious amount of talent) into a good thing ( a stronger work ethic). The problem is when it becomes a narrative about who you are. The problem is when it becomes a coping mechanism, a shield, a way of avoiding actually being your best self. The problem is when it’s not just an objective assessment (hey I’m not that talented but it’s cool), but rather an emotional, vitriolic attack on yourself (“you suck”). When that’s the case it doesn’t matter how you package it — it’s a big problem.

No, I didn’t come into mountain bike racing with a prodigious talent or loads of experience in a similar sport. But I had (and have) other advantages, ones that were often forgotten while I was busy explaining to everyone how little talent I had, while I was busy explaining away my mistakes and failures by saying ” well, I suck.” It’s a typical problem — as humans, we are quick to notice the wind in our face, and quick to take our tailwinds for granted.

When I read this person’s post, I thought a few things:

  1. Just like we are quicker to notice our headwinds, we are also finely tuned to notice the people who are faster/better/stronger than us. So when this person wrote “any reasonably fit person,” they were probably looking at just a select few anomalies — a handful of people they knew who had progressed insanely quickly. They probably forgot about all the people who showed up at the gym a handful of times and then quit. “Reasonably fit person” probably did not encompass every person who had ever run a mile or held a dumbbell over their heads. If it did, the perspective might be quite different.
  2. Eight years is a long time. Most people won’t work on something for eight years, especially if they don’t immediately have success. So yeah, maybe a lot of people out there COULD beat you if they trained solidly for 8-10 months, but they won’t. So who cares? Sometimes the hardest part is getting started, and even if there are a lot of potentially talented people who never got started (or quit before they really got anywhere) well, who cares? It doesn’t matter what other people could achieve, it matters what you do achieve.
  3. And ultimately, you’re doing something awesome, so keep doing the awesome thing and stop thinking about everybody else.”

– Syd

https://www.sydschulz.com/mountain-biking/tailwinds-and-flawed-theories-of-self

 

Chemeketa SBM Announcement

Are you working long and hard on your business, but feel like you are not getting to everything that’s important? Let the Small Business Management (SBM) team provide additional resources and the support of one-on-one coaching to tackle the things that get in your way. Apply to join SBM where established business owners experience increased efficiency, profitability and support through monthly one-on-one business coaching to meet your individual needs. Discover how to start working on your business-not just in it-through interactive classroom learning sessions. Learn by exchanging ideas with other successful business owners and expert presenters.

The SBM program helps established small businesses find the balance you crave between life and work. It helps you rediscover enthusiasm for your work that you felt when you first started your business.

They don’t talk at you. They don’t tell you what to do. They are here to work beside you and treat you as the expert on your business. They want you to feel empowered to stretch and grow. The SBM program is a safe environment to try new things and share your successes and challenges with other experienced business owners.

The Chemeketa Small Business Management (SBM) program is for established business owners like you who want to run a stronger and more profitable business, and be surrounded by other like-minded business owners. Combining classroom learning with one-on-one coaching, this program is an outstanding way to help you achieve your business dreams.

In fact, businesses in this year’s SBM programs increased sales by nearly $8 million in 2017 to 2018 and created 98 jobs!

You can find more details about the program on their website and see testimonials from other business owners and see specifically how they have help others with their businesses.

If interested, your next step is to complete the application on the website sbm.chemeketa.edu or call to chat with them over the next couple of weeks if you have questions whether this program is a good fit for you.

The Chemeketa Small Business Management (SBM) program kicks off mid-September. At this moment, they have a limited number of open spots for the 2018-2019 program year.

Chamber Luncheon – Shawn Howe

This next speaker series luncheon on Monday, July 16th, will be from a Dallas High School graduate who has coached on some of the nation’s largest stages including University of Tennessee, USC, Memphis, and others. Shawn Howe, new Defensive Coordinator at Coastal Carolina University, will be sharing his story with us.

On February 23rd, Shawn Howe was named the Defensive Line Coach by Coastal Carolina head football coach Joe Moglia.

Howe spent the last three seasons as the assistant head coach and defensive coordinator at Dixie State University. Last season, Howe’s defense ranked 21st in the nation in fewest passing yards allowed and picked off 13 passes.

Prior to his arrival to DSU, he was the defensive line coach at Humboldt State University for the 2013 and 2014 seasons. During his tenure at HSU, Howe coached one All-American and six all-conference performers while his 2014 unit led the nation in sacks.

Howe worked with the Southern California football program for two seasons, including the 2012 season with current CCU defensive coordinator Marvin Sanders. Howe as a graduate assistant working with the defensive line in 2012 and was a defensive assistant in 2011. Before his time with the Trojans, Howe spent four years in the state of Tennessee with a brief stint at Gardner-Webb. In 2010, he was an assistant strength and conditioning coach at Tennessee helping the Volunteers reach the Music City Bowl. However, from January to June 2010 Howe was the defensive line coach with the Runnin’ Bulldogs. He spent the previous three years as a graduate assistant coach at Memphis. He worked the Tigers’ defense the first two years and coached the tight ends in 2009. Memphis played in the New Orleans Bowl in 2007, and the St. Petersburg Bowl in 2008.

He came to Memphis after working as a volunteer assistant at North Carolina State in 2006, helping with the defensive line. He began his coaching career at Rocky Mountain College, his alma mater, serving as the outside linebackers coach in 2004, and 2005.

Howe played defensive end and linebacker at College of the Redwoods in Eureka, CA in 2000, and 2001, earning All-Mid-Empire Conference first team honors in 2000 when he was the team’s Defensive Lineman of the Year. He then transferred to Rocky Mountain College, where he was a two-year starter at defensive end. He graduated from Rocky Mountain College in 2005 with a bachelor’s degree in physical education and health.

This Monday Shawn Howe will be speaking on his journey from small town Dallas, to some of the biggest fields in the nation. You don’t want to miss this!

The 10 Don’ts of Networking

Don’t dress down. Looks matter, whether you like it or not. Before you can “wow” people with your impressive set of skills, you’ll need to awe them with your appearance and body language.

Don’t dismiss people who don’t look important. “You should behave here like everyone you interact with has the potential… to get you a cover story in The New York Times.” Sometimes it’s the secretary that will get the job done, not the president.

Don’t expect a job. Getting a job might be more about who you know than what you know – but don’t be so obvious about it.

Don’t be uninformed. No card, no contact. Be up to date with what is going on in your field and in the field whose business you are trying to get. It’s okay to learn something new, but if you don’t know something crucial then you have just lost their faith in your abilities.

Don’t collect business cards like candy. “Don’t trick-or-treat for business cards.” Make an honest connection with someone before you start soliciting for business. They are more likely to give it after a positive interaction verses a cold call.

Don’t only think about yourself. “Networking can be described as the process of interacting or engaging in communication with other for mutual assistance or support.”

Don’t be vague. “I want to go back to school… maybe do something in the business world.” Almost everything has something to do with business. Have clear goals in mind.

Don’t reach too high. Having Mark Cuban, Warren Buffet, or John Maxwell on speed dial would be great – for you. But would you really be able to offer them much help? Maybe… but probably not.

Don’t monopolize anyone’s time. This isn’t a phone call or an email exchange, so give people space to mingle. If they are giving hand signals to a partner across the room to help them escape, you’ve lost the opportunity.

Don’t follow up with a sales pitch. Before you ask for a favor, you need to develop the relationship further, Sue Clement writes on Businessknowhow.com. She recommends referencing something you spoke about at the networking event and then offering the person something they can use – whether that is an introduction or a helpful article.